Lethargic chicken no egg today

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by KHoward, Jan 22, 2014.

  1. KHoward

    KHoward Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hello,

    I have a 4.5 month old Leghorn that started laying last week, one per day. Today, she is lethargic, has a really floppy comb, her tail is down, and she is standing a lot. I noticed that below her vent there is a big glop of yellowish albumen. My guess is that she has a broken egg inside her? I have her isolated in the coop with a container of scrambled egg, crushed egg shell, oyster shell, and yogurt. At the moment she has no interest in the food. I also have a sheet draped over her box to give her some privacy.

    Any comments or tips?

    Thanks in advance,
     
  2. pwand

    pwand Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Last edited: Jan 22, 2014
  3. seminolewind

    seminolewind Flock Mistress Premium Member

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  4. KHoward

    KHoward Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thank you - I will try tomorrow and let you know how it goes. I have to do some research because I have no idea what I'm doing.

    From the description, does it sound like a broken shell? How does a shell break in there, anyway?
     
  5. pwand

    pwand Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Were there is yellow stuff coming from her vent area would suggest a broken egg. If you wait, she will most likely will die. Use KY Jel and stick your finger in to feel for broken shells and clean them out.

    Go to this link to do a flush. Go to post two for instructions.
    https://www.backyardchickens.com/t/673106/broken-egg-inside-of-chicken
     
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2014
  6. ten chicks

    ten chicks Chillin' With My Peeps

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    X2,this cannot wait!!!
     
  7. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    X3! Can you take her to a vet? If not, you're gonna have to cowboy or cowgirl up and help this hen or she will probably die.

    -Kathy
     
  8. KHoward

    KHoward Chillin' With My Peeps

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    * Update*

    I checked and there is no shell in there. The best description of yesterday's excretion is the following: "If I had a cold and blew my nose". It was the color of mucus - a yellowish/clear substance, not yolk colored. Her crop and abdomen seem normal.

    I moved her out of the coop to a quiet, 50°F area with some water, oyster shells, yogurt and layer pellets. She is standing but puffed up and neck scrunched like she is trying to keep warm. I will check on her in a few hours and give an update.

    -Kristen
     
    Last edited: Jan 23, 2014
  9. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    50°F is way too cold for a sick bird.

    Sick birds are often hypothermic and should be placed in heated (brooder-type) enclosures b (Fig 7.7) in a quiet environment (see Chapter 1, Clinical Practice). A temperature of 85° F (29° C) with 70% humidity is desirable for most sick birds. If brooders are not equipped with a humidity source, placing a small dish of water in the enclosure will often supply adequate humidity. A moist towel that is heated and placed on the bottom of a cage or incubator rapidly humidifies the environment, as indicated by the fogging of the acrylic cage front.
    Source: http://avianmedicine.net/content/uploads/2013/03/07_emergency_and_critical_care.pdf

    80° F is what I usually aim for, and I'm not set up in a way where I can get to 70% humidity, so I don't worry about it. [​IMG]

    -Kathy
     
  10. KHoward

    KHoward Chillin' With My Peeps

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    * Update*

    So far, so good. She has pooped a few times. I can't tell if she is eating or drinking.

    I have increased the heat in the room and should be able to get it up to 85 in a few hours. I also didn't want her to go into shock taking her from zero to 85 so I thought a gradual change in temp would be better? Maybe it doesn't matter to chickens to go from one extreme to another. It's my first time taking a chicken inside in the winter.

    ~~~
    I couldn't get the room to 85 so I put a heat lamp on in the afternoon. I checked on her a few times during the day and she seemed about the same, and hanging out under the heat lamp. Tonight when I checked on her she was laying under the lamp, leg and wing stretched out waiting for the cabana girl to bring her a pina colada.

    When she saw me she stood up, tail high and she started drinking water and I saw that she had eaten some of her food.

    Assuming she is on the road to recovery, how long should I keep her inside and when she is ready to go back to the coop, should I lower the heat in the room gradually so there won't be such a drastic change in temp (85 to zero) when I bring her out?

    I wonder if it was just too cold for her? None of the chickens laid any eggs today, but I still got three from my Campbells.
     
    Last edited: Jan 23, 2014

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