Lethargic chicken with mucusy excretions

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by DitzyFish, Aug 5, 2014.

  1. DitzyFish

    DitzyFish New Egg

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    Feb 25, 2014
    Hi, everybody. I have a Japanese bantam/laced Wyandotte cross that's about 10-12 weeks old, and I think it's a rooster.
    Starting at about 8 PM PDT last night (August 4th), the poor little bugger started sneezing almost nonstop (shortly after eating a tiny bit of peanut butter, in case that's relevant - barely even a beakful). At around 9 PM, we noticed he was acting lethargic and wasn't making very much noise (odd, compared to his usual noisy agitation close to bedtime). This morning, after my mom left for work, I checked on him because usually when left alone, he cries and wanders around until he finds someone. He looked like he had stayed exactly where he had slept, and didn't seem at all interested in moving. At around 9 AM, I noticed his mouth is full of a thick, yellowish mucus, and some of it had been leaking out and crusting around his beak. It is now 3 PM PDT, and so far he's barely moved much, and has spent most of the day sleeping. To contrast, usually he runs around and charges at my feet and talks constantly, pretty much all day. He's made noise only when startled, and even then it sounds halfhearted. His poop is also not really poop anymore, but a milky, yellowish mucus with tiny brown lumps and sometimes little pink or red spots. He has not eaten or drank anything since last night, though his crop is empty. He's a house chicken, and has only been in contact with two other chickens recently, one of which is a rooster we recently treated for cocci but has seemed perfectly healthy for a couple weeks.

    Nutshell of symptoms:
    •Lethargic
    •Loss of appetite
    •Mucusy excretions from both ends
    •Pink or red spots in poop
    •Sneezing
    •Ruffled feathers
    •Drooping tail
    •Occasional wheezing/whistling noise
    •Nearly silent; doesn't make noise or chatter

    I was hoping someone might have an idea of what might be wrong, and if there's anything I can do to treat him. Thank you!

    Update: 8/6/14, 2:00 PM PDT
    Little rooster seems to be feeling better! His tail is no longer drooping, and while he's still a little slow to jump anywhere, he is much more active today and his little naps are becoming less frequent. His appetite is coming back, though he only eats a little bit at a time. I only saw him take a small sip of water on his own just a few minutes ago, but it seems like he's on his way to regular eating and drinking. He does still have mucusy excretions, but it's not as excessive now and he's stopped wheezing/whistling and no longer sneezes. I will continue monitoring and helping him drink until he does it more freely on his own. Thank you, cafarmgirl, for your help! C:
     
    Last edited: Aug 6, 2014
  2. cafarmgirl

    cafarmgirl Overrun With Chickens

    If he's had contact with other chickens he could easily be brewing a case of coccidiosis. Since you are seeing spots of red in his poop I would treat for it asap so you can at least rule that out. If he does have it, it can kill him fast.

    The sneezing and mucous could be a respiratory disease, also picked up from the other birds, or perhaps he aspirated some of the peanut butter? That would also account for the wheezing/whistling sound.

    I would treat with the Corid first and see if he improves and watch the other symptoms closely, see if they continue. If they do and it looks like a respiratory bug he'll probably need antibiotic's to clear up the symptoms. If he is not eating/drinking well on his own you'll need to give him the medicated water with an eye dropper, very slowly and carefully, just dribble a few drops in the side of his beak and let him swallow. Do this very often the first day or so, every couple hours if you can, until he perks up and starts drinking well on his own.
     
  3. DitzyFish

    DitzyFish New Egg

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    Feb 25, 2014
    Will do! Thank you!
     

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