Lethargic Turkey

Discussion in 'Turkeys' started by txflea, Aug 10, 2014.

  1. txflea

    txflea New Egg

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    Mar 31, 2013
    Brazoria, Texas
    I have 3 turkeys, 1 rio and 2 burbons, They are about 6 months old. They have been free ranging with my other chickens for a while now.
    One of my burbons is acting ''off''... The other two are active and social, this one is stand offish and not really wanting to hang out with anyone. He (I'm assuming its he) is fluffing out his feathers all droopy like and walking really slow. Easy to catch and just generally acting lethargic. runny poop, but not black in color and still has some color (brown and white) and some substance to it.
    I quarantined him and was giving him a broad spectrum antibiotic and he seemed to perk up, waited a few days then my youngest daughter let him loose back with everyone else. (she said he was acting hyper and wanted out so she let him out without asking me first)
    He's was out for about 3 days and now he's acting the same way again. He's thin compared to the other two turkeys and again easy to catch.
    I'm not sure if he's just overheated (it is in the very high 90's here with over 60% humidity) or if he's got some malady I am not seeing. No runny nose, no cough, no rattle sounds when he breathes, no black spots on his head, no losing feathers, just runny brown and white poo with a little substance (chunks)
    I have brought him in my house and put him in a cage, I have a fan blowing on him and he's not doing the droopy feathers anymore. He is eating blueberries (he loves blueberries) but not really wanting his feed. He is drinking water, and I have added the broad spectrum antibiotic again. But I'm wondering if I should add electrolytes instead.
    Any suggestions to what could be wrong?

    This is my first venture into turkeys, I have chickens and if this was a chicken I would think it was overheated but for days?
    Sorry if this post seems a bit scattered, I am just concerned.
     
  2. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    Four things come to mind when I have turkey that looks off.

    1) Histomoniasis
    2) Bacterial infection
    3) Worms
    4) Coccidiosis

    -Kathy
     
    Last edited: Aug 11, 2014
  3. txflea

    txflea New Egg

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    Mar 31, 2013
    Brazoria, Texas

    I googled every single one of those and it seems to me like he has histomoniasis. But he doesn't have tr blue head or the sulfur yellow poo.
    I hate to have to cull him but it's looking more and more like what's going to have to happen
     
  4. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    I've treated many with it and none have ever had a blue head and only one had yellow poop. If it's just blackhead, that's easy to treat with metronidazole, which you can get at Petsmart as API General Cure. It's comes in a box with several powder pack that each have 250mg metronidazole and 75mg Praziquantil, which you don't need, but it won't hurt him either. The harder part to treat is the secondary infections that they almost always get, and for that you would need Baytril, Cipro, Augmentin or Clavamox. If he isn't eating and drinking, he needs to be tube fed.

    It's lots of work, but they can live if treated soon enough. Mine are pets, so I do everything I can for them.

    -Kathy
     
  5. txflea

    txflea New Egg

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    Mar 31, 2013
    Brazoria, Texas
    We made the call today, I can't risk the health of my flock so we culled him.
     
  6. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    So sorry... If it's blackhead your others are already at risk. You can do a quick necropsy and probably find the problem yourself.

    -Kathy
     

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