lice and mites

Discussion in 'Predators and Pests' started by chattykathy306, Oct 17, 2012.

  1. chattykathy306

    chattykathy306 Out Of The Brooder

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    May 6, 2012
    SInce I am new to chickens, I would like info on lice and mites. How common are they, where do they come from and how would I know if my hens have them?
     
  2. Imp

    Imp All things share the same breath- Chief Seattle

    Some people have lots of problems with parasites, others none. I've had chickens 9 years, and never a problem. They mostly come from wild birds or the environment or new chickens you integrate into your flock. You can see them.

    http://ohioline.osu.edu/vme-fact/0018.html

    Imp
     
  3. BigBadRooster

    BigBadRooster Out Of The Brooder

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    I've been raising chickens for over a year now so not overly experienced but I had one incounter with the critters. If you go to your coop at night it is easier if you are two people just hold the chickens by the legs upside down another person using a flashlight can look in the vent area the critters move around at night and will run away from the light. I tried all the "organic" and "natural" solutions that I found online none of these worked so I went to the local Coop store and purchased dusting powder oh yeah the chemical stuff...anyway got rid of the critters and I didn't collect the eggs for a little while after to make sure.

    Things you can do to try and prevent. You can give them access to sand they while take dust baths in the sand themselves and they will get rid of some of the critters. You can also use food grade DE on them if you want. I heard of one guy who hung an old panty hose full of DE at the entrance of his chicken coop so the chicken would bump into it and dust themselves whenever they go in or out. Due to the price of DE I don't do this. I havn't had any more problems now in about a year. I now have problems with somekind of worm that is present in there poo. I bought somekind of dewormer that I will add to there water suppose to get rid of them.
     
  4. chattykathy306

    chattykathy306 Out Of The Brooder

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    May 6, 2012
    Thanks. I am unable to handle my chickens, although they allow me to get very close to them. Would I have to actually pick them up and inspect them to see these creepy things? I have been so happy with my chickens, which I just got in July and would be very disappointed if they were infested with something. What are the methods of prevention? They free range much of the day and go into the woods adjoining the yard.
     
  5. ChickensRDinos

    ChickensRDinos Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 19, 2012
    Los Angeles
    You definitely need to hold them to really tell. You need to look under their wings, all the way through their feathers to the skin in their side/armpit area. Also examine their vents and legs and face.

    I keep DE mixed into my dust baths and bedding and dust all new birds before I add them to the coop even if I do not see mites. I have only had one mite problem and it was from adding a new bird without quarantining and dusting first. If you do have a problem make sure you dust the birds AND clean the entire coop.
     
  6. dkosh

    dkosh Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have approximately 300 chickens and some of my chickens always seem to be bothered by them. They will pick their feathers out and have bald butts. I feel most of mine come from sparrows (I call them flying mice) they are vermon that carry disease and mites and lice. Besides the parasites they bring in they will eat a butt load of grain. I always try to keep dusting areas filled for them. I use equal parts of diatomaceous earth, wood ash and sand.
     
  7. BigBadRooster

    BigBadRooster Out Of The Brooder

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    If you go in your coop at night they will allow you to pick them up they become night blind and very vulnerable. That is why we lock up our chickens at night.
     

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