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lifting my coop back up?

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by Autumn T, Jan 25, 2009.

  1. Autumn T

    Autumn T Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Dec 23, 2008
    Central Texas
    my future coop is sinking into the ground!
    it is a wood storage shed the old owners left and did not put on bricks about 8x12 I guess .... huge

    how do I lift it?
    should I bother?
    the doors are rotting off from floods last yr. they will be replaced
    the bottom of one side in about 4 in into the ground
     
  2. TexasVet

    TexasVet Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I had the same problem with my metal shed. I lifted one corner, then had one of the kids put a cement block under it. Slowly worked my way all around until the whole thing is now sitting on blocks. If it continues to sink, I may have to add a second row.

    Kathy in Texas
     
  3. Autumn T

    Autumn T Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Dec 23, 2008
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    how do I lift it? it has to be at LEAST 600lbs of wood!
    shingled roof, wood floor, and sides
     
  4. cw

    cw Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jan 11, 2009
    green co.
    you have accses to a real tractor (not a chicken tractor, every time i say tractor everyone assumes chicken tractor)
     
  5. Opa

    Opa Opa-wan Chickenobi

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    dig under one corner, then use a simple lever and fulcrum to lift, place cribbing material under in keep repeating process until you have raised it to desire height. To constuct a lever and fulcrum- take a 2x4 place on edge under wall- then place a block under 2x4 as close to building as possible- push down on opposite end.
     
  6. Fishen4fun

    Fishen4fun Out Of The Brooder

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    Dec 17, 2008
    Chillicothe, Ohio
    I lifted alot of different thigs with one of them tall tractor jacks.
    Can't think of the name but its red with holes up the shaft and the thing lifts one hole or lowers one hole wiht alot of leverage.
     
  7. Opa

    Opa Opa-wan Chickenobi

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    Hi-Low Jack- they sell them at Tractor Supply
     
  8. willheveland

    willheveland Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jan 29, 2008
    southern tier,NY
    Quote:I use one of them little floor jacks($25-30.) and jack it up a corner at a time little by little.Then get it high enough to get at least a cinderblock under it then maybe some small peices of 2x4,or 1x4 to get it level.Once you get it level doors and windows open so much better.Your waterer won't leak on the floor either.If it's nice and high critters won't wanna live under it.I usually take a big flat rock and put under the block for a nice flat base.I usually do this in the spring and fall to make sure it stays nice and level.After winter from the freezing and thawing the ground always heaves.Maybe you can get it high enough to avoid the flood.Not that chickens are swimmers. Good luck. Will
    [​IMG]
     
  9. patandchickens

    patandchickens Flock Mistress

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    Ontario, Canada
    Quote:First: GET OTHER EXPERIENCED ADULTS TO HELP YOU. Seriously. A person can get REALLY REALLY hurt if there's an accident when jacking up even 'just' an 8x12 shed.

    Second: decide whether it is really salvageable. Anything on the ground is probably rotting as we speak, and one common cause of buildings *appearing* to sink ito the ground is that the bottom bits have already disappeared due to rot. If you are not sure what you are looking at/for, get the opinion of someone who does. A single part can be replaced (albeit sometimes with a great deal of aggravation); if all the floor joists and sills are a write-off and the lower parts of the wall studs are bad too, it may be a lot easier just to take it apart and rebuild.

    If you do decide to jack it up, here is the method I'm most familiar with: First nail diagonal braces (ideally, 2x6s) across all walls, in one direction on the inside and in the opposite direction on the outside so that if you had x-ray vision the braces on a single wall would look like an X. Make sure you're nailing well, and into studs not just siding/sheathing.

    Then, when the ground is reasonably firm (don't try to jack it up in the mud or on soggy ground), get four 2' concrete pavers or cut a half-sheet of 3/4" plywood into quarters. Dig underneath one corner til you have room to put 2 stacked pavers or plywood pieces down as a base, plus put a car jack on top of them. Do that, and sloooowwwly jack the corner up. Chock it (the heaviest-grade mostly-filled cinderblocks work for not too heavy buildings, otherwise use lengths of 4x4 or 6x6 stacked cribwise); you may want to put a paver or piece of plywood under the chock to prevent sinking if the ground is not rock-hard. Repeat this for all corners, being very VERY careful and keeping all body parts well away from anything that could collapse on them (if a sill gives way, the whole thing can smash down...)

    Once it is up on all four corners, you can put in whatever permanent corner blocks/supports you are intending, and THEN do any necessary repairs to sills/joists/whatever. DO NOT attempt to repair anyting while it is on chocks or, worse, the jack. Once it is all done, THEN you can remove the diagonal braces (unless some had to come off for the repair work).

    GOod luck, PLEASE be real careful,

    Pat
     
  10. Autumn T

    Autumn T Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Dec 23, 2008
    Central Texas
    Hubby says it is still sturdy. he said it is mainly buried thanks to the floods we had a yr ago. he keeps his tools in there and it is nice and dry and sound. (I broke the door mowing cause I am impatient and well, it is slightly rotted...LOL)

    he was thinking some sort of jack but did not know how big.

    if I had my way the shed(S) would be moved side by side and onto the driveway so I have more land area. that ain't happening

    wish we had friends with a tractor and blades we could get under it. that would make it quick and easy.
     

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