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Lighting/Heat Lamp

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by newbie341, Apr 11, 2016.

  1. newbie341

    newbie341 New Egg

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    Apr 11, 2016
    We have 8 chicks about a week to 10 days old. We have a 250 watt clear heat lamp that we run 24/7. Is this good, or do we need to buy the red heat lamp, and not run light 24/7? If so, or if not, what is the age that we can start turning the lights off? I wouldn't think that lighting 24/7 would be good. Thanks...
     
  2. 0wen

    0wen Chillin' With My Peeps

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    They need a heat source available all the time, but also an area to get away from it (but the light over half the brooder. You can gradually reduce the temp weekly (raising the light - not turning it off). I'd get a thermometer to put in the brooder so you can monitor the temp.
     
  3. newbie341

    newbie341 New Egg

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    Apr 11, 2016
    [​IMG]

    This is what they are in for now. What would a Brooder be considered of? Do I need to put cardboard or something about halfway to seperate each end? Thanks
     
  4. oldhenlikesdogs

    oldhenlikesdogs Runs With Chickens Premium Member

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    Where are you brooding them? I like using a 125 watt clear heat bulb, the 250 can be too hot. I never use the red bulbs. If your chicks are crowded or too hot sometimes they start to peck each other, the red bulb is to disguise the color of blood, I'd rather brood correctly and avoid it.

    You should start your brooding temperature at about 85-90 directly under the light for the first week. Make sure they can move away from it if they want. You raise the lamp up or get a lower watt bulb to lower the temperature 5 degrees a week until it's the same as the ambient temperature or they are mostly feathered, 6-10 weeks.
     
  5. Robblob

    Robblob Out Of The Brooder

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    I would really recommend going over to the mama heating pad thread and checking out the setups. I'm new to this as well and started the exact same way as you with a clear 250W bulb burning down on the chicks. I was quickly convinced that a MHP was the way to go so I went and bought some wire fencing and a sunbeam heating pad from Wal-Mart and it's working great.
     
    1 person likes this.
  6. 0wen

    0wen Chillin' With My Peeps

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    x2
     
  7. mobius

    mobius Chillin' With My Peeps

    x3. Those heating lamps are dreadful fire hazards...I don't know why they still sell them...once I learned about MHP I changed to it at about 1.5 weeks...much better for the chicks...
     
  8. newbie341

    newbie341 New Egg

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    I think it's fine. Hatcheries, and feed companies that breed, hatch, and sale chicks mainly all use Heat Lamps, or a bulb. I haven't seen the chicks piled together directly underneath, or trying to get away from it, so it must be fine. They use the entire cage. My coop is being mailed currently. Figure I'll keep them in the cage for 2-3 more weeks, and then move them to the Coop. I live in Texas so outside temp is almost perfect right now.
     
  9. oldhenlikesdogs

    oldhenlikesdogs Runs With Chickens Premium Member

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    They aren't fire hazards if used correctly. I find it funny people bash the lowly heat lamp for use for brooding chicks but go sticking them in their coops in winter because they think their chickens are cold. Used correctly a heat lamp is a nice cheap way to brood. Everyone has a right to choose what's best for them.
     
    1 person likes this.
  10. mobius

    mobius Chillin' With My Peeps

    While this may be true, they do not come with instructions, and yes everyone has a right to choose....I don't believe I challenged that. I have, however. read several different threads posted since I joined about fires that were caught just in time and exploding bulbs and so on. Further they cannot be monitored 24/7...unfortunately...
     

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