Lighting in the winter

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by kowell275, Aug 4, 2011.

  1. kowell275

    kowell275 Out Of The Brooder

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    May 10, 2011
    stanwood
    Hi I would like to see what people have for lighting in the winter to keep there egg production up. I am wonting to get an idea what works I live in wa so we get cold and less daylight.
     
  2. MareeZoCool

    MareeZoCool Chillin' With My Peeps

    [​IMG] Hi Kowell, [​IMG] from COOL COUNTRY ~Ohio. I didn't use extra lighting during the winter months. Mu Black Andalusian hen and one RIR kept laying daily. I think allowing them to get out into as much sunlight as possible helped keep my girls on schedule. Good luck!
     
  3. Nicole01

    Nicole01 Overrun With Chickens

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    We installed a 100 watt light on the coop ceiling. The light has a glass cover and a wire cage protecting it. Our coop is inside our garage. We were unable to cut out a window on the side of the house. The ventelation is inside the garage. Our coop is 100% pitch black if both doors are closed and the light is off. We are also planning on putting a heat lamp with a good bulb during the coldest of tempatures. Hopefully this will help keep the egg production going well through the winter months.
     
  4. pheasantfreak

    pheasantfreak Chillin' With My Peeps

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    we have to use a light here they just dont get enough light so its hooked up to a timer but it also keeps the coop a little warmer
     
  5. kowell275

    kowell275 Out Of The Brooder

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    May 10, 2011
    stanwood
    can i see photos of sum of the setups pleese
     
  6. Fred's Hens

    Fred's Hens Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

    A very simple design is light, working off a timer. A simple "trouble light" or "drop light" that mechanic used to use works well and are inexpensive. The little timers are only $10 or so and typically sold to control Christmas lights.

    I do not push my hens through the winter. I don't have the light on much. It's only 40 watts, but that's enough. I have it come on at 5 am. It goes off at 4:30 pm so as not to catch them unaware of the approaching darkness. That's their cue to go to the roosts. Our winter days are very, very short. Supposedly, lights should illumine for 14+ hours for maximum egg production, but I think 12 hours is enough. They need to sleep, rest and use their energies for keeping warm. Production drops some, but nothing horrible.
     
  7. Ole rooster

    Ole rooster Chillin' With My Peeps

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    What does pushing the laying season beyond what we would call normal have to do with egg production over her lifetime , if anything?
     
  8. Fred's Hens

    Fred's Hens Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

    Pushing them to lay heavy, all the time, 365, will indeed shorten their laying career. Some folks contend that a chicken only has X amount of eggs in her for her lifetime. Since they eat 365, those whose interest lies in egg production as a priority, go ahead and maximize the the FOOD IN to EGGS OUT ratio. This is a management decision. I need "some" production out of them in the winter, but I choose not to push them anywhere near to the max. Hope that helps.
     
  9. Nicole01

    Nicole01 Overrun With Chickens

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    I never thought a heat lamp would push the egg laying??? We are really concerned of the temps when it's -20F. This is our first flock and we don't have any eggs yet. Our coop has zero windows, so we needed a nice light. Someone here told me to buy a GE heat bulb vs a ceramic heat emmiter, so I thought we were doing the right thing.
     
  10. Judy

    Judy Chicken Obsessed Staff Member Premium Member

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    Quote:It's not the heat that increases egg laying, it's the light, daylight or an ordinary light bulb. If you bought a read heat lamp (bulb) I doubt it will increase laying. If you have no window, how much ventilation do you have? And using a light to replace a window is not IMO a good idea; you need to be able to get fresh air as well as natural light in there, and they love to look out a window.
     

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