1. Luke10

    Luke10 Out Of The Brooder

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    Oct 27, 2010
    Lancashire, UK
    Hello, i have almost completed the construction of my chicken coop. One of the things i still need to install is an artificial light. The coop is about 40 foot away from my house and i need ideas of how to get electricity up there. What is the cheapest/best way?

    Also what type of lighting should i use and what wattage should i use? The coop is 8 by 8ft.

    Thanks for all your comments in advance,
    Luke.
     
    Last edited: Nov 14, 2010
  2. True Grit

    True Grit Chillin' With My Peeps

    [​IMG] Extension cord![​IMG] Luckily for me DH had been wanting to put lights in the shed so after he built the coop he pulled the trigger and had wire run under the driveway and into the shed and coop both. We just use a 15 watt cfl rubber coated bulb we got at IKEA in both the run and the coop.
     
    Last edited: Nov 14, 2010
  3. amydzek

    amydzek Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oct 27, 2010
    the chickens need light in their coop?????? I dont have light in mine!!!! do I need lights?????
     
  4. Luke10

    Luke10 Out Of The Brooder

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    Oct 27, 2010
    Lancashire, UK
    Quote:Oh yes forgot about extension cord [​IMG] Thank you
     
    Last edited: Nov 14, 2010
  5. amydzek

    amydzek Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oct 27, 2010
    thank you, we are in fl and get all the sun so I think I will give them a little night light...
     
  6. woodmort

    woodmort Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Take it from an old timer whose been there--an extension cord is NOT the best way to go. Ideally, if your coop is going to be in a permanent location dig a 12-inch or deeper trench between the nearest electrical outlet in your house or garage and lay underground cable. Then get an electrician to tie it into your existing electrical system--it would be best if it were on its own circuit. Build in a couple of outdoor type outlets (the kind with covers) up near the ceiling to keep the dust and chickens out of them. If you think you want to use an extension cord go with a #12 or (minimum) 14 gauge, 3-wire cord from the nearest outlet and fly it, do not run it on the ground. Fasten a small outlet strip--preferably one that has its own fuse--to the ceiling and cover those outlets that you're not using.

    Once you have service a 20w florescent fixture on a timer will be best. (I've used a 20w GE Bright Stick for years and highly recommend it.) Fasten the fixture to the wall, don't hang a bulb from the ceiling. Sooner or later your coop is going to become dusty with a lot of combustible stuff around like straw, cobwebs, feathers and shavings so be careful where the open outlets and bulbs are located. Stick to a bulb that produces the least amount of heat.


    To answer Luke10: There are two schools of thought on this but I'm on the side that says if you want your chickens to lay and be relatively active during the winter a minimum of 14 hrs of light is best. In the place I live that means a timed light on for an extra 6 hours a day--in my case from 6 to 9 and 4 to 8.
     
  7. Luke10

    Luke10 Out Of The Brooder

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    Oct 27, 2010
    Lancashire, UK
    Quote:Wow thank you very much for a very detailed post, great advice!
     
  8. patandchickens

    patandchickens Flock Mistress

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    I know most of the forum will say "oh just use an extension cord" but remember that they do periodically cause fires or electrocutions when abused in this way. I'm not saying don't do it ever under any circumstances, necessarily; but I *am* saying don't do it *lightly*.

    So, I mean, why do you want electric light out there?

    If you are just concerned about being able to check on the chickens after dark, best plan is to get yourself a $15 headlamp. Great things, useful for a lot more than checking chickens.

    If winter laying is an issue, then at high latitudes (e.g. the UK, which is the original poster's location) you may need to choose between either a) accept a drop or temporary cessation in laying, or b) run an extension cord as safely as possible and hope for the best, c) run PROPER electric service out there, or d) fiddle around getting together the components to put a solar cell on a controller and battery with a DC timer on it [which BYCers keep *talking* about but I am not sure I have actually seen a working example posted yet]. At lower latitudes (e.g. amydzek is in Florida) you can often get away with just installing a shrewdly-chosen solar patio/driveway light, so that the panel is on the outside of the coop on the S side and the actual light part is on the inside of the coop. The battery will gradually dim out as the night wears on but if you are playing your cards right it can give you enough extra hours of light to add up to a 14 hr day for the chickens.

    For laying purposes, all you really need is enough light to read a newspaper by without squinting unduly, at chicken level that is. In an 8x8 coop that may be a 40 or 60w bulb, or so, depending on ceiling height and what color things are painted in there.

    For those in cold climates, running a heated waterer or heated waterer base is a whole nother thing and really is best done by running proper electric service.

    GOod luck, have fun,

    Pat
     
  9. Luke10

    Luke10 Out Of The Brooder

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    Oct 27, 2010
    Lancashire, UK
    Quote:Thank you very much for a very detailed post! Very helpful!
     

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