Lil Hop ALong has no use of legs... is there any hope?

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by LinckHillPoultry, May 24, 2008.

  1. LinckHillPoultry

    LinckHillPoultry Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jan 17, 2008
    Pennsylvania
    I don't know if any of you remember, but awhile back I had a post about my sultan chick that, "broke his leg", now I'm thinking it is more of a deformity then anything. He can't walk. He has a hard time getting around, and the thing that breaks my heart is, it's never going to get any better. I've been trying to ponder ways to help him, if there was anything I could build for him to get around in or do anything for him. I don't have the heart put him down. I need to find a way to make it so he can move around.
    Do any of you have any ideas of how to help him?


    Meet Lil Hop Along


    "Mommy, what happened to me? I used to walk when I was Little, something happened to me."

    "Mommy, what's wrong with my legs? Why can't I use them? Why do they look like this?"
    [​IMG]

    "Mommy, it's hard to balance for me."
    [​IMG]

    "Mommy, it's hard for me to get around."
    [​IMG]

    "Mommy, this penguin is my friend."
    [​IMG]


    "Mommy, can anybody help me?"
     
  2. Kessidy

    Kessidy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 13, 2008
    Is he in any pain? I wish I knew a way to help him get around but I don't. I hate to say it but I would cull if he seems to be in pain, but other than that just hope for the best. Poor little thing.
     
  3. ZooMummzy

    ZooMummzy Queen of the Zoo

    Mar 31, 2008
    Philomath, Oregon
    Is it both legs or just one? My little Banty had one bad leg and I splinted her for about a month with band-aids. It never healed properly, but it gave her time to strengthen her other leg and learn to use her wings. I never thought she was in pain since she never slowed down. Not sure what to do if both legs are effected, but I agree with you, I couldn't cull it.
     
  4. MissPrissy

    MissPrissy Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    May 7, 2007
    Forks, Virginia
    I had one like that. It was pitiful to watch it struggle to get food and water. We culled it last night. [​IMG]
     
  5. Sparrow

    Sparrow Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 11, 2008
    My personal outlook on these situations is this: If the animal has NOT chosen to give up on living, or if it is NOT in obvious long-term pain, I think it deserves the chance to continue living. Until the day the animal gives up, I will keep fighting for it.

    I know that not everyone agrees with my philosophy. But, I have rescued so many animals who were severely injured or very near death and I never expected them to make it....only to see them heal and grow back to great health and able to carry on a normal(or almost normal) life. Some of these animals were in such bad condition that other people suggested that I euthanize them, and I have had to let a few go. BUT, the majority of them can pull through with some help, and I just love seeing them thrive. [​IMG]
     
  6. SpeckledHills

    SpeckledHills Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 25, 2008
    Idaho/Utah
    I am very sorry your chick has such difficulty, and glad to know he's had such care from you.
    He may have splay leg. The condition often develops if a chick has too slick of footing (such as metal or newspaper) or other difficulties when he is first learning to walk. Because he doesn't get success when he tries to brace his feet and stand and walk, he resorts to pushing himself along by pushing a leg out to the side. His brain and muscles quickly decide that's the way to get around and it's hard to get him to pick up normal walking.
    I had 1 newborn chick recover from this when I did physical therapy "patterning"--helping him stand and practice walking correctly by moving his legs with my fingers many times each day for 4 or so days.
    Hobbles on the chick's lower legs (that allow the legs to be a little farther apart than standing position, so the chick has room to walk), made of bandaids or sports tape are commonly used to treat the problem and may help young chicks if put on within a day or so of the problem appearing. Tape should be changed at least every other day (Baby oil helps in getting the tape off gently, and water-free antibacterial hand cleaner helps in getting the oiliness of the baby oil off after) to keep it from constricting the chick's growth. If hobbles don't help the problem be fixed in less than 6 days, the chick isn't likely to recover--at least not completely.
    DCT, "the friendly poultry orthopedist," whom you can locate via Google search, has helpful advice for a number of leg conditions.
    We had a chick injured at birth who developed splay leg and other difficulties. Over time, it became apparent that in her case her problems would not get better. I worked with her laboriously (and joyfully) for over 5 months until it became just too time-comsuming to try to keep her comfortable as her deformities increased, and we had to put her down.
    Here are pictures of her some of the foam, tape, paper towel, and velcro braces I made for her.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: May 25, 2008
  7. ZooMummzy

    ZooMummzy Queen of the Zoo

    Mar 31, 2008
    Philomath, Oregon
    Quote:I completely agree with you and have done the same so many times. I have been called crazy many times for this, but the animals "tell me" me when it's time to let go.
     
  8. SpeckledHills

    SpeckledHills Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 25, 2008
    Idaho/Utah
    BTW--The type of foam hobbles I used on our Angel helped her be able to get around when older, though didn't cure her legs, & possibly could help your Lil HopAlong. Let me know if you'd like details on making them.
     
  9. ZooMummzy

    ZooMummzy Queen of the Zoo

    Mar 31, 2008
    Philomath, Oregon
    Quote:I would like some details about them SpeckledHills. Quincy won't like them but if they could help her, I'd give them a try.
     
  10. kees

    kees Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 5, 2008
    Aww...it's obvious that you love your chick so much! Please try to splint the legs ASAP because I read that the longer it takes before it's done, the lower the success rate. Let us know how your baby makes out!
     

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