Limit of 6 Chicken in North Canton, Ohio

Discussion in 'Local Chicken Laws & Ordinances (and how to change' started by greenpeeps, Jan 26, 2010.

  1. greenpeeps

    greenpeeps Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 15, 2009
    Greenford, Ohio
    Heard on the raido this morning that there is a new law passed last night that limits 6 chickens per household in North Canton. Just wanted to pass this on.

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  2. tdgill

    tdgill Chillin' With My Peeps

    what was the law prior to (if any)?

    bummer
     
  3. greenpeeps

    greenpeeps Chillin' With My Peeps

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    129
    Apr 15, 2009
    Greenford, Ohio
    Not to sure. I live outside of Youngstown, Ohio and heard this on a local radio station on my way to work. They said something about the city receiving to many complanints.

    NORTH CANTON — Owners of chickens will have to follow a new city law if they want to keep their birds.

    The ordinance states residents can have no more than six hens and restricts how the birds should be penned. It also states that residents can keep chickens only for personal use. Roosters are not allowed.

    City Council passed the ordinance 6-1, with Councilman Pat DeOrio, at-large, casting the dissenting vote.

    A ban on chickens has been kicked around since September. The initial proposal was to ban all farm animals in the city — chickens, cows, sheep, goats, ducks, geese, llamas, donkeys, horses, hogs, swine and buffalo. But, gradually, the ordinance changed to restrict chickens.

    Barb Benson, who keeps six chickens at her house on Penny Lane Street SE, said Monday night that a complaint from a neighbor’s relative prompted Councilman Jeff Davies, Ward 3, to introduce the ordinance banning farm animals.

    Benson wondered how a complaint from one person who didn’t live in the area could lead to an ordinance.

    Benson bought her chickens last year. Before buying the birds, she researched city ordinances and Stark County Health Department rules to be certain she was allowed to keep the chickens.

    “I was legally allowed to have them,” Benson said.

    She should be able to keep the birds under the new law.

    DeOrio has spoken against the proposal for several weeks. In December, he noted the problems city employees might face trying to enforce the law.

    Jodi Farnsworth, a friend of Benson, commended DeOrio and chastised other council members for how they handled the ordinance.

    Watching recent sessions has been an eye-opening experience, Farnsworth told council. “I watched a neighborhood dispute turn into an ordinance for the whole city,” she said.
     

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