Limping Cockerel

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by JoycieBoycie, Aug 10, 2016.

  1. JoycieBoycie

    JoycieBoycie Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 28, 2016
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    I noticed that my cockerel was started limping yesterday evening. I checked his right foot, which is the one he's favoring, and no apparent signs of injury like bumblefoot. He is favoring the foot and limping more this morning. No changes in behavior. Still feisty, chasing the ladies, and trying to mate (hes 17 weeks old). But I know chicken hide their pain.

    Any advice on how to help him.

    *note, my husband went in to the run yesterday to give treats and the cockerel started attacking him. My husband deflected the attacks with just putting his knee out to block the attacks. I'm thinking the hard landings from attacking my husband caused a sprain.
     
  2. azjustin

    azjustin Chillin' With My Peeps

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    A human aggressive cockeral will need more than a few blocks to curb his behavior, and curbing will need to be done for everyone to be happy. But, that's a completely different topic.

    That being said: as long as he's eating, drinking, acting somewhat normal, I would just keep an eye out for infection and treat symptomatically. If it gets worse, cull for the sake of the animal.

    We have a RIR cockeral that had a pretty bad break in his leg and would just hop around on one leg for several weeks, but still ate and drank like a champ. I tried to help, but the more there was interference, the more he fought so we just left him alone. Several months later and now I wouldn't even be able to tell you which one it was.

    Good luck.
     
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  3. BackyardDove

    BackyardDove Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I agree. He could've just hurt himself and will heal on his own with time. Since chickens jump and fall all the time, it's only a matter of time before they naturally hurt themselves. I had a pullet suddenly start noticeably limping one day, but she's fine now and I didn't treat her. As for the aggression, he may be feeling vulnerable because of his injury and is compensating by being more aggressive. That's no excuse though and if it happens again, I would separate him into a smaller area by himself. Roosters who've just come of age to mate also run the risk of becoming overly aggressive, probably due to the flood of hormones they're experiencing. Usually, just separating them from the rest of the flock for a couple weeks will fix this aggression.
     
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  4. JoycieBoycie

    JoycieBoycie Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 28, 2016
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    Great advice everyone! Thank you so much, I think you just reassured me of what I thought should be done which is let him be and allow him to heal and start having my husband work on becoming a top roo with this cockerel.

    This is all so new to me. Even with common sense, I still question if what I'm doing is right, so your input is greatly appreciated.
     
  5. berettp

    berettp Out Of The Brooder

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    Jun 14, 2016
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    I have a four week old that clenches her foot then stretches the leg and wing could she have taken a fall and strained something. What can be done if anything. She runs around and walks ok
     
  6. JoycieBoycie

    JoycieBoycie Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 28, 2016
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    That is normal, as far as I know. They're just stretching :) Mine are almost 18 weeks old and I still see them do this.
     
  7. berettp

    berettp Out Of The Brooder

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    Jun 14, 2016
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    Ok thanks I'm like a new father overreacting to everything. Appreciate the help
     
  8. JoycieBoycie

    JoycieBoycie Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 28, 2016
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    I'm a new chicken Mama so we are in the same boat, learn as we go. :)
     

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