1. No more empty nest!

    No more empty nest! Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 17, 2010
    Western Pennsylvania
    I have a hen that started limping earlier this week. I had to separate her to keep the rooster off her. I can't find anything wrong with her leg, no cut, abcess, I stretched it out and she didn't seem to mind. She won't put any weight on it but will leave it down to balance herself. What else should I do or look for? She is eating and drinking well. No eggs though, previously she was laying regularly. Any ideas?? thanks
     
  2. Judy

    Judy Moderator Staff Member

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    Feb 5, 2009
    South Georgia
    Check closely for bumblefoot. It might not have been visible before. Lots of info on here about it.

    When I've had one limping, I've found they go back to normal in a day or two. It has to be easy to pull or strain something on those little legs. Good luck.
     
  3. Barred Babies

    Barred Babies Red Roof Farms

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    Sep 20, 2009
    Pride, La.
    Nothing if you can't find anything obviously wrong. I've had several do this and I've just left them alone. I just made sure when I gave treats or threw scratch I gave some to her right there so she wouldn't have to go far. After a few days she was much better. Before long you couldn't even tell!! I wouldn't seperate her unless it's a constant thing with the rooster!!!

    Hope she gets to feeling better!
     
  4. No more empty nest!

    No more empty nest! Out Of The Brooder

    16
    0
    22
    Sep 17, 2010
    Western Pennsylvania
    It has been a full week and she hasn't improved or laid an egg. I did have to separate her the rooster was relentless. She is standing more but still no improvement with the leg. I lifted her up to examine her again, turned her on her back so I could see and she flailed both legs going like mad. Would a dislocation still let her move her leg like that. She is still eating and drinking and pooing no problem there. She closes her eyes a lot, even when she is standing. How long can she go without laying an egg? Is that a symptom or will they not lay an egg when they are hurt and it won't cause a problem. I lifted her out to eat with the other hens, she went right to the food and ate. But left her foot sort of behind her, not dragging but didn't pull it up under her, sort of uses it to balance. She will pull it up if I touch it though. Thank you to all with advise. I am going to check out the bumble foot more although I didn't see any swelling.
     
  5. toejam

    toejam Never enough birds

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    Dec 21, 2009
    SW Ohio, Wilmington
    Sorry for highjacking your thread [​IMG] this also happened to a pair of my jungle fowl. All of a sudden they started limping. Everything else is the same but they limp. Only 1 pair does, not my other pair. Thursday( next time I'm at dads) I'll look over them again. Again sorry for stealing your post.
     
  6. Judy

    Judy Moderator Staff Member

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    Feb 5, 2009
    South Georgia
    Look here:

    http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ps044

    Near then end there are a couple of tables. For the nonrespiratory one, lameness occurs in staph arthritis and in fowl cholera. Both are treatable.
     
  7. kathyinmo

    kathyinmo Nothing In Moderation

    Also from the site ddawn mentioned:

    Mycoplasma synoviae

    Synonyms: MS, infectious synovitis, synovitis, silent air sac

    Species affected: chickens and turkeys.

    Clinical signs: Birds infected with the synovitis form show lameness, followed by lethargy, reluctance to move, swollen joints, stilted gait, loss of weight, and formation of breast blisters. Birds infected with the respiratory form exhibit respiratory distress. Greenish diarrhea is common in dying birds (see Table 1 ). Clinically, the disease in indistinguishable from MG.

    Transmission: MS is transmitted from infected breeder to progeny via the egg. Within a flock, MS is spread by direct contact with infected birds as well as through airborne particles over short distances.

    Treatment: Recovery is slow for both respiratory and synovitis forms. Several antibiotics are variably effective. The most effective are tylosin, erthromycin, spectinomycin, lincomycin, and chlorotectracycline. These antibiotics can be given by injection while some can be administered in the feed or drinking water. These treatments are most effective when the antibiotics are injected.

    Prevention: Eradication is the best and only sure control. Do not use breeder replacements from flocks that have had MS. The National Poultry Improvement Plan monitors for MS.
     

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