Limping Roo

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by chicksooner, Sep 30, 2012.

  1. chicksooner

    chicksooner Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,802
    66
    161
    Aug 19, 2012
    Oklahoma
    My Roo has been limping for a couple days. He is isolated now and I started him on an antibiotic per the vet. He does not have any obvious signs of bumblefoot. He acts fine other than the limp. I was looking at his claws and I think they are pretty long. Would that cause him to limp? How do I trim his nails? I have him in a confined space I might as well tackle that. I was looking at his foot and ankle earlier to see if I could see a slipped tendon but I guess this something I would have to feel for. Any other ideas?
     
  2. TurtlePowerTrav

    TurtlePowerTrav T.K.'s Farm

    3,382
    119
    208
    Jul 29, 2012
    Oregon City, OR
    My Coop
    For clipping claws use a cat claw clipper. It has the shield that is about the right length as not to cut into the blood vessels in it. I would not cut more than 1/8 inch off if you have to use other clippers.
     
  3. chicksooner

    chicksooner Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,802
    66
    161
    Aug 19, 2012
    Oklahoma
    tonight his pad looks red and I think there are red lines going up his leg. I cannot see a scab or cut of any kind on his foot or his toes. He is on Sulmet but not sure it is doing any good.
     
  4. SpeckledHills

    SpeckledHills Chillin' With My Peeps

    2,100
    58
    231
    May 25, 2008
    Idaho/Utah
    I don't know of any disease that would cause lameness that Sulmet would help with.

    Mycoplasma Synovaie MIGHT be a possible cause for his problem, but I don't know enough about it to be sure. Here is a little info on it that I have noted on my PoultryPedia.com website:


    Diagnose Synovitis / Mycoplasma Synovaie



    • Disease caused by Mycoplasma Synovaie (MS). Also called Infectious Synovitis or Silent Air Sac
    • Symptoms: Lameness. Then lethargy and reluctance to move, hock joints swollen with cream-color fluid, stiff gait, weight loss, blisters on breast. Birds will often sit on their hocks.
      • In respiratory form of MS, birds show respiratory distress.
    • The best antibiotics for treating are generally tylosin, erthromycin, spectinomycin, lincomycin, and chlortetracycline. They are most effective if given by injection.


    There is info on slipped tendons at https://sites.google.com/a/poultrypedia.com/poultrypedia/poultry-podiatry#chick_crooked_leg if it is helpful.

    You could try to post a video or photos & those can help people to come up with more possible diagnoses.
     
  5. chickenzoo

    chickenzoo Emu Hugger

    Sulmet only treats some respitory illness and coccidia.
    With the red pad I would think it is due to injury. Soak his foot in some Epsom salts. Keep him in a carrier etc that minimizes movement. Keep food and water close, add some vitamins to his water. Keep an eye on him for any other symptoms.
     
  6. chicksooner

    chicksooner Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,802
    66
    161
    Aug 19, 2012
    Oklahoma
    Thanks. I will have to see if I can get some pics. It is hard to hold him and use a camera. Will pick up some epsom salts today. Do I stop using the antibiotic or should I follow thru with it since it is an antibiotic?
     
  7. chicksooner

    chicksooner Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,802
    66
    161
    Aug 19, 2012
    Oklahoma
    I actually found a vet that will take a look at him. Hopefully they can figure it out. His comb is looking really pale this afternoon.
     
  8. SpeckledHills

    SpeckledHills Chillin' With My Peeps

    2,100
    58
    231
    May 25, 2008
    Idaho/Utah
    I hope the vet is one who knows a reasonable amount about treating chickens. The other vet was off-base recommending a medicine that (as far as I know) could not possibly address the symptom your roo is suffering with.
    I wouldn't keep giving the med unless you find out there is a specific lameness condition he has that it would treat. Sulfa meds are quite hard on chickens' systems. Also, antibiotics kill off both some bad & some good bacteria. It would be good to have as much good bacteria as possible left in his system to fight diseases, though if you learn there is an antibiotic that will help with his specific problems, I would definitely use it.
    It feels a little risky to stop an antibiotic early, in case there are bad bacteria in a chicken's system at the time that may become resistant if you stop early. Personally I would, though, in this case.
    Does the hock on his hurt leg look different than the other one? Does it look flat or like the tendon has slipped out of the center notch in the bones? If you haven't had the chance to read the link on slipped tendons, it might help to do so, & may be helpful in your discussions with the vet. It is good to fix the problem ASAP so the tendon doesn't shorten up while it's out of place & become harder to put back.
     
    Last edited: Oct 2, 2012
  9. chicksooner

    chicksooner Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,802
    66
    161
    Aug 19, 2012
    Oklahoma
    Took him to an avian vet this morning. No bumblefoot found and nothing else to indicate what is wrong with him. So we are keeping him confined and watching to see if he develops other symptoms or gets better. He is of the opinion that Mr. Rooster just injured himself somehow and needs time to recover. Oh and the vet gave him dewormer since we were there and he was a willing patient. [​IMG] So Mr. Rooster is getting special treatment for another week or so.
     
  10. chicksooner

    chicksooner Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,802
    66
    161
    Aug 19, 2012
    Oklahoma
    Based on some reading I started him on a B complex vitamin to see if it helps his leg feel better faster. Not sure it will help but I am trying.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by