1. If this is your first time on BYC, we suggest you start with one of these three options:
    Raising Chickens Chicken Coops Join BYC
    If you're already a member of our community, click here to login & click here to learn what's new!

Linoleum flooring in the coop??

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by Fox and the Hen, Apr 4, 2016.

  1. Fox and the Hen

    Fox and the Hen Out Of The Brooder

    10
    0
    22
    Mar 24, 2016
    Hi folks,

    Another coop construction question. I have an OSB (chip board) sheet for the floor of my coop and it will of course be covered by bedding before the birds get in there, but I recently found some left over linoleum from the house and thought it might make things easier to clean if I laid it over the OSB on the floor of the coop. I just wasn't sure if there would be any potential negative points to having it in the coop.

    As always, any advice is appreciated.

    Thanks

    Fox and the Hen
     
  2. TimCline

    TimCline Chillin' With My Peeps

    194
    13
    53
    Mar 31, 2016
    Inez, ky
    Probably wouldn't hurt anything if it's covered with bedding but I can tell you osb is garbage. Completely falls apart when it gets wet. I would use plywood. Buy nice instead of buying twice.
     
    1 person likes this.
  3. N F C

    N F C Home in WY Premium Member

    33,462
    8,497
    616
    Dec 12, 2013
    Wyoming
    My coop was made in two stages...1/2 of it has linoleum on the floor and the other 1/2 does not (just wood). Even with a deep layer of hay, the linoleum side cleans up much better and easier. If you have it available to you, I'd use it!
     
  4. Hokum Coco

    Hokum Coco Overrun With Chickens

    3,313
    602
    306
    Dec 6, 2012
    New Brunswick,Canada
    It would not be my first choice in a perfect world. If you have it on hand I think you are good to go. My personal experience with linoleum over tongue and groove boards for decades and it works fine (still looks like new never had to replace any flooring yet not even water stained)...As long as you know that water and your floor are enemies going in.
    Keep in check any saturated areas that may happen by whatever means and not give it a chance to get under your linoleum Example. Heavy rains with open doors or windows, or a spilled 5 gal bucket of water. I also throw whole corn as a scratch feed over my wood shavings and for the most part the chickens keep the bedding aerated and the shavings dry. I also rake out the corners when ever needed.
    Normal chicken dropping do contain water and your bedding will be able to control that while the linoleum provides more than enough protection. Also do not let your OSB come in contact with the earth that would be a sure killer.Make sure you floor is elevated before and dring the spring thaw as cement blocks or footings have a tendency to settle during that time


    Worst case senario (excluding flooding)
    Even if it does happen your damage is going to be concentrated in a small area and if anything be an easy fix. If you check your OSB yearly paying particular attention to the outside boarder or seams for swelled of flaking chip board you will be able to keep a handle on things. It will definitely require more monitoring and up keep.
     
    Last edited: Apr 5, 2016
  5. josher57

    josher57 Out Of The Brooder

    41
    8
    26
    Feb 26, 2016
    Alabama
    I would not use chip board for the floor. It will be the first thing you have to replace. My suggestion is buy some exterior plywood and them cover with the linoleum. Between spilled water, poop and rain getting in, the chip board won't last long and it will literally swell and then flake off piece by piece.
     
  6. TimCline

    TimCline Chillin' With My Peeps

    194
    13
    53
    Mar 31, 2016
    Inez, ky
    X2 plywood only costs about 5$ more per sheet. 1/2 inch ply is plenty.
     
  7. mikecfry

    mikecfry Out Of The Brooder

    26
    0
    22
    Apr 3, 2016
    Shamong, NJ
    I'd agree OSB seems like it could give you some issues. I'm building my coop now as well and I used 2x6 16 oc covered in 23/32 ply. I coated that top and bottom with a layer of paint to seal it before attached to the joists, then will lay linoleum on top. The 23/32 is probably overkill but we'll be walking inside as well so the extra support couldn't hurt.
     
  8. Fox and the Hen

    Fox and the Hen Out Of The Brooder

    10
    0
    22
    Mar 24, 2016
    Thanks for all the replies! Unfortunately the coop is already constructed and OSB is what fit in the budget, so that is what I have to work with moving forward. The whole coop is built up on 4x4 pressure treated skids and sits on a gravel pad, so there should not be any exterior water getting to the floor. I will cover the inside with the extra linoleum I have and hopefully that will be an extra layer of protection for the floor. Ultimately if the floor breaks down too much I will just have to replace it. The roof of the coop and the nesting boxes are covered with steel roofing, so they should be ok, but the walls are also sheeted in OSB. Would I be wise to cover them in a tyvex wrap or something similar to protect them from the elements before I clad them with something more pleasing to the eye?

    Any advice or suggestions are welcome. Thanks

    Fox and the Hen
     
  9. mikecfry

    mikecfry Out Of The Brooder

    26
    0
    22
    Apr 3, 2016
    Shamong, NJ
    Is the OSB on the walls on the interior or exterior of the studs? If it's on the interior you could always put T1-11 on the outside and that should keep elements away from the OSB. If it's on the exterior a good sealant or coat of paint should do, you'll just want to remain diligent about keeping fresh paint on the walls to seal any moisture from the OSB. Once the moisture gets into the board it can deteriorate very very quickly.
     
  10. ChickenMammX4

    ChickenMammX4 Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,020
    204
    151
    Mar 17, 2015
    SW Ohio
    FWIW, our coop has an OSB floor. It was originally built for dogs about 3 years ago but never really used much. It's been used for chickens for a little over a year with no break-down issues. We did paint it with DeckOver, a thick, rubbery-like deck paint. There is no water that gets inside, windows are awning-type that open out, the waterer is in the run. The droppings are contained mostly to the poopboard and the floor is covered with deep bedding.

    If you can keep the OSB dry, you shouldn't have any problems. Covering with linoleum with give extra protection.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by