List of chicken preditors. My list. You can add your own.

Discussion in 'Predators and Pests' started by kartking22, Jul 8, 2008.

  1. kartking22

    kartking22 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jan 12, 2008
    Wisconsin
    In Northern WI here we have.......
    Racoon
    Mink
    Rats
    Fox
    Coyotes
    Timber wolves
    Bob cats
    Mountain lions
    Great horned owl
    Sparrow hawk
    Red tailed hawk
    Bald eagle
    Pine martins
    Badgers
    Weasels
    Stray dogs
    Feral cats
    and even Sea Gulls. ( Take young chicks)
    How the heck do you protect your chickens from all of these preditors?
    You have to accept a loss to learn how to keep them safe or accept the loss if you want to free range.
    Nature finds food in the easiest places. Chickens are the easiest food to find for them.
    Add your list of preditors in your area.
    I would like to think that my area has the most preditors.
    I guess that I'll find out soon...
     
  2. beefy

    beefy Flamingo Daddy-o

    Apr 21, 2007
    South Georgia
    South Georgia

    Opossums
    Racoon
    Rats
    Fox
    Coyotes
    Bob cats
    Mountain lions
    Owls
    Sparrow hawk (Coopers Hawk may be the same?)
    Red tailed hawk
    Bald eagle
    Stray dogs
    pet dogs
    Feral cats
    pet cats
    crows
    snakes
    armadillos (eggs only)
    feral hogs (eggs-ground nest)
    alligator
    osprey

    though i have all of these, so far ive lost birds to coyotes opposum and coopers hawk

    mine freerange 24/7 and i expect some loss. i'm used to nature. you can baby sit your chickens all day and night and you will still lose some.
     
    Last edited: Jul 8, 2008
  3. WoodlandWoman

    WoodlandWoman Overrun With Chickens

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    May 8, 2007
    Wisconsin
    We have the majority of predators on your list, also.

    We have a perimeter fence and a big mean dog that patrols the area regularly. She's not mean to everybody, but she knows who is supposed to be here and who isn't. Varmints are on the "isn't" list. Our spaniel is a keen hunter and often gives the first alert, even though he isn't as threatening looking. Two dogs hunting in a pack are also much more dangerous to a predator than one is. We have a lot of cover for the chickens to hang out under and that is generally their preference.

    The chickens are locked up tight at night. During hawk migration weeks, they are in lock down in a covered run, except when I take them for daily supervised walks and I actively scan for hawks, as well as have the dogs running with us. I also carry a big stick. I check the sky before I let them out and if I see a dozen hawks up there, literally, then we reschedule that walk. We didn't used to have such a problem during migrations. Times do change and we adapt.

    My approach is to make dinner at our house less convenient and more risky than at other places. For most predators during most of the year, this works pretty well for us. Hawk migration time is tougher, not just because you have a larger number of predators that are coming through, but they are off their normal hunting grounds and expending a lot of energy. I think they can be more desperate and willing to take more risk.
     
  4. dacjohns

    dacjohns People Cracker Upper

    A sparrow hawk is an American Kestrel and is really a falcon.
    Audubon called it the American Sparrow-Hawk.
     
  5. nautical_bouy

    nautical_bouy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 23, 2008
    Beaver PA
    How about me???? [​IMG] guess whats for dinner !!!!!
     
  6. scrapmom5

    scrapmom5 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 21, 2008
    Utah
    In Utah we have

    Cougar
    Bear
    Raccoon (Too Many)
    Eagles
    Hawks
    Crows (HUGE Crows)
    Snakes
    Coyote
    Wolf (in the area)
    Dogs
    Cats
    Fox
    Rats
    People

    And others I am sure I have missed.
     
  7. Kor

    Kor New Egg

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    Jun 26, 2008
    Missouri
    Some of those crows might not be crows, but ravens.

    Crows are smart bullies.

    Ravens are twice as intelligent gangsters on steroids, tattoos and all.
     
  8. scrapmom5

    scrapmom5 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 21, 2008
    Utah
    Then Perhaps they are ravens...We watch them come and land on the roof to watch our girls...We can't get rid of them. We have thrown rocks and thought maybe I should let me son target shoot with his bb gun. They are really annoying. My girls run for cover when they come around.
     
  9. gamebirdsonly

    gamebirdsonly Overrun With Chickens

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    Mar 5, 2007
    UTAH
    Anything that eats meat.
     
  10. chickorama

    chickorama Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 8, 2008
    Massachusetts
    We live in MA, and we don't have nearly as many predators, but I suggest a run with a ceiling and a floor. We buried ours underground to stop things like skunks, raccoons, opossums,etc. from getting our babies, but so that they could still scratch for worms. As for a house, our first one was an old doghouse. Anything works, as long as there aren't any holes or cracks to slip through; raccoons are much smarter than lots of people think.
     

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