6mutts

Songster
11 Years
Oct 6, 2008
140
0
119
St. Clair, MO
hmmm...I used a tractor, and the run is on open ground and the upstairs is pretty small. All I do is throw some straw in the nesting area and plan on scattering it on the rest during winter. Should I be doing something else? I clean out my coop like once a week and replace straw and scrape out all the poo on a daily basis. I also put straw in the run and then scrape it out and replace it like once a month or so. Heres a pic of the coop so you can get an idea of what im trying to say...oh this pic is BEFORE it was finighed, but you get the idea

 

6mutts

Songster
11 Years
Oct 6, 2008
140
0
119
St. Clair, MO
To add to that question....Do chickens need to dust in winter? Geez...if so im screwed, there is NO room in my coop for a dust pan!
 

patandchickens

Flock Mistress
12 Years
Apr 20, 2007
12,520
253
341
Ontario, Canada
Quote:Where do you live. A tiny coop like that will be awfully hard to winterize for a cold-winter area, especially in terms of ventilation-without-freezing-the-chickens but also in terms of living space.

You might consider getting some plastic (rigid, or thick plastic sheeting) to partially cover the run part. You could keep the upwind side covered and have an openable cover on the ends and/or south side (depending on your climate). This would make the run a more appealing place for them to hang out, as well as keeping the upstairs just a little warmer.

Remember the ground is usually wet in wintertime and the grass isn't growing so the chickens can easily turn the run part into a horrible chilly mud-swamp if you do not move the tractor frequently or (alternatively) bed it DEEPLY with hay or straw that you change periodically.

Good luck,

Pat
 

6mutts

Songster
11 Years
Oct 6, 2008
140
0
119
St. Clair, MO
Quote:Where do you live. A tiny coop like that will be awfully hard to winterize for a cold-winter area, especially in terms of ventilation-without-freezing-the-chickens but also in terms of living space.

You might consider getting some plastic (rigid, or thick plastic sheeting) to partially cover the run part. You could keep the upwind side covered and have an openable cover on the ends and/or south side (depending on your climate). This would make the run a more appealing place for them to hang out, as well as keeping the upstairs just a little warmer.

Remember the ground is usually wet in wintertime and the grass isn't growing so the chickens can easily turn the run part into a horrible chilly mud-swamp if you do not move the tractor frequently or (alternatively) bed it DEEPLY with hay or straw that you change periodically.

Good luck,

Pat

We are near St. Louis MO, have been wondering about winterizing too! Plastic may be my best option. Not sure how to do it exactly though, since my doors open upward I would have to unwrap everytime I feed and such. I was thinking maybe after I put up the fencing surrounding the coop I could cover the entire area and make like a chicken bubble! Not sure how practical that idea is either!
 

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