Little bumps on legs

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by flock-mama, Jul 7, 2008.

  1. flock-mama

    flock-mama Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Ok I am trying to tell if I have roosters or hens. I have been watching feathers grow, Etc. Today I noticed all my chicks have little bumps on the legs like the showing of a rooster. (I had never noticed before) I am just so worried I am going to have alot more roosters. So I went out and looked at my big girls, and they have little bumps on their legs too. So that didn't help me at all! Anyway I need to get it through my head, more time needs to go by. They are only 2 1/2 weeks old! I don't mind a few more Roosters but I already have 6!

    I have read that a males feather grow in slower, is that right?
    I have 10 Bo's and 10 RIR
     
  2. seminolewind

    seminolewind Flock Mistress Premium Member

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    I don't think the bumps mean anything if they all have them. See if some get pink color to their combs earlier than others.
     
  3. flock-mama

    flock-mama Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Well I have been watching combs they are all the same at this point. lol. Legs are changing, a few are thicker than the others. Thats how I noticed bumps.
     
  4. Matt A NC

    Matt A NC Overrun With Chickens

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    The "buttons" are on every bird, male and female.

    With alot of breeds the males will have thicker legs early to support the weight of a growing rooster.

    Matt
     
  5. Wolf-Kim

    Wolf-Kim Chillin' With My Peeps

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    You cannot tell by looking for spurs until a little while later. Your little chicks have had those "bumps" on their legs since day 1, you just haven't noticed them yet. LOL

    Combs and wattles are the easiest thing to look for. I have chicks who will start showing combs and wattles as early as just a few weeks, even before their heads are feathered.

    -Kim
     

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