Little Lambs Eat Ivy ...

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by MissPrissy, May 30, 2008.

  1. MissPrissy

    MissPrissy Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    Forks, Virginia
    I know a ditty nutty as a fruitcake Goofy as a goon and silly as a loon
    Some call it pretty others call it crazy but they all sing this tune:
    Mairzy Doats And Dozy Doats and liddle lamzy divey
    A kiddley divey too, wouldn't you?
    Yes! Mairzy doats And Dozy Doats and liddle lamzy divey A kiddley divey too, wouldn't you?


    If the words sound queer, and funny to your ear, a little bit jumbled and jivey,
    Sing "Mares eat oats and does eat oats and little lambs eat ivy"
    Oh!
    Mairzy Doats and Dozy Doats and liddle lamzy divey A kiddley divey too, wouldn't you - oo?
    A kiddley divey too, wouldn't you?

    I had a last minute opportunity to get a couple lambs yesterday. I need some reassuarnce, please. LOL

    I got 2 ewe lambs and a ram lamb (which will be for meat only, I am VERY uncomfortable with a full size ram here). They are almost 3 months old. I think they were on the verge of starving. The people had 27 or something of them in a paddock under a tree canopy with no pasture whatsoever to graze. The were sharing 1 bale of alfalfa hay per day and a little bit of cracked corn. She told me they are not getting near enough to eat when i looked at them2 weeks ago. I can only guess the feed was enough only to just maintain them.

    [​IMG]

    I have pasture and the grass is really high enough to cut for hay. We have had amazing rain this spring and everything is full and flourishing like crazy. So I put them in my front pasture quarantined away from my goats that live in my middle pasture. They have NEVER seen pasture with grass. They were raised on bare dirt. Their tails where never docked. They are a freesian mix and nice size. The females are approaching maybe 50lbs and the boy is crazy heavy MUCH bigger than the ewe lambs. They were born in February. I paid $45 each for them.

    The girl that had them said they had to be wormed every month? I was wondering if becase they were on dirt and so many over there in a small place they were more prone and needed it more so than here on clean pasture and good water? At what weight would you take the boy to market for processing? I figure 2 months here on pasture with real feed and clean living he would be market size?? Or is he market size at 3 months and I just need to give him 2 weeks or so on clean pasture to make sure everything is good with them?

    [​IMG]

    What age do you breed the ewes? 5 months? If we kept him 2 months (he is not related to the ewe lambs) and let him breed ewes and take him to market then is that too early too breed the females.

    I plan to breed them, take the lambs they drop and bottle feed them, sell these wild 'do not touch me', "leary of people", "stay just out of your reach" animals and raise my own tame, gentle lambs for next years harvest.

    They seem so different from goats. Now that I have them I am a little nervous.

    Thanks for any advice you can give me.
     
  2. sweetshoplady

    sweetshoplady Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 4, 2008
    Venice, Florida
    Angie,

    I am so jealous! [​IMG] Those are so beautiful!

    I know nothing about sheep, but your plan sounds good to me to get bottle-fed babies off of them.

    With cows, when you take them to the sale barn, its by weight. So I'd let them grow up.

    Best of luck with them! I look forward to hearing your adventures with sheep.
     
  3. ozark hen

    ozark hen Living My Dream

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    You Nervous???????????? [​IMG] No, no, no, if you put your mind to it and relax you can do anything........you have taught us all that! Good plan girl! Who knows...maybe these animals will come to trust you and see you for who you are? Keep us posted and we want lots of pics. [​IMG]
     
  4. MissPrissy

    MissPrissy Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    Forks, Virginia
    I know! I know! LOL

    It is just I was told to give them this med and give them shots of this and give them doses of that and I really hate to medicate an animal routinely when there is no evidence of it being needed. They are lambs, they have been wormed. Do I have to medicate sheep all the time?!? Why?!?

    I am nervous about what they really need. I don't want my kids eating medicated meat.
     
  5. ozark hen

    ozark hen Living My Dream

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    Ok, I looked this up for you
    http://www.sheep101.info/201/ check it out and see if it helps?
    I completely understand, I would be the same way. By the way, quite a bargain you got there!! You are one lucky lady. [​IMG]
     
  6. greyfields

    greyfields Overrun With Chickens

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    OH CRAP. I JUST ZAPPED YOUR POST INSTEAD OF REPLYING. I'M SO SORRY BUT I HAVE TO RUN TO THE MARKET.!! GAH!!!
     
  7. greyfields

    greyfields Overrun With Chickens

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    Sorry Ange, I've been out all day cutting silage. This will have to be quick as I need to go set up for the farm market now. It sounds like you did a good thing.


    I have pasture and the grass is really high enough to cut for hay.

    Red flag. Sheep need grass under 6" tall in order to be able to eat it. It's especially bad in young lambs as they only have their milk teeth. So, I would try to mow a swatch for them so they can eat.

    We have had amazing rain this spring and everything is full and flourishing like crazy. So I put them in my front pasture quarantined away from my goats that live in my middle pasture. T

    I'm trying really hard to think of anything which could pass between goats and sheep. My goats and ship live intermixed... the buck goes with the ram and live with a small flock of wethers and the llamas.

    hey have NEVER seen pasture with grass. They were raised on bare dirt. Their tails where never docked. They are a freesian mix and nice size. The females are approaching maybe 50lbs and the boy is crazy heavy MUCH bigger than the ewe lambs. They were born in February. I paid $45 each for them.

    I would get those tails done. But at this point, they're probably too big to just band. I'd call a vet for advice.


    The girl that had them said they had to be wormed every month?

    We really have to stay on top of worming lambs here. Every two months for the first 6 months for sure... then 9 months then again at 12 months right after lambing and before they get out on the pasture again. If you do not want to overworm, the only option you have is to get fecals done each month then worm only when needed.

    I was wondering if becase they were on dirt and so many over there in a small place they were more prone and needed it more so than here on clean pasture and good water?

    I'm generally skeptical that you can avoid parasistes simply by 'clean living'. You never know what animals were on the place before you moved there, or what wild animals may be coming around at night.

    At what weight would you take the boy to market for processing?

    I take mine in when they are 110 lbs live weight. That gives me 50-60 lbs hanging, which gives me 35-40 lbs of lamb meat per lamb. I'm worried he's intact, though. I'm not sure if it will taint the meat. But I've never eaten a ram and I can't think of anyone I know ever eating a ram lamb. I think you should whetherize him (vet probably has to do it by this point) then rent a buck when the girls are ready to breed.


    I figure 2 months here on pasture with real feed and clean living he would be market size?? Or is he market size at 3 months and I just need to give him 2 weeks or so on clean pasture to make sure everything is good with them?

    Mine usually go in around 7 months old


    What age do you breed the ewes? 5 months?

    You want them to lamb just after they turn 1 (just like goats). Their gestation is also 150 days. So, I generally breed my ewes two weeks before I let the buck in with the does, so I don't have everyone dropping at once. However, I have no issues running goats and sheep together. Mine rather get along.

    If we kept him 2 months (he is not related to the ewe lambs) and let him breed ewes and take him to market then is that too early too breed the females.

    Again, I'm troubled by his testicles.

    My ram is incredibly friendly and I can easily stand and hold him while we put on his harness or do his hooves. Rams are not innately mean or wild, it depends how htey are raised.

    Also, get those ridiculous ropes off them. They have plenty of wool to grab into if you need to move them. [​IMG]

    I plan to breed them, take the lambs they drop and bottle feed them, sell these wild 'do not touch me', "leary of people", "stay just
    out of your reach" animals and raise my own tame, gentle lambs for next years harvest.

    I dunno about the plan. I don't bottle feed lambs and they turn out fine. If you have them in teh jug for 1-2 weeks after lambing, they'll get used to your contact. Also, 'wild' ewe lambs often come around once they've been in the jug and realize you aer a source of food. But, by nature, sheep are much more skiddish than goats, and it's not necessarily a fault.


    They seem so different from goats. Now that I have them I am a little nervous.

    Sheep are just small cows with wool. They behave a lot like cows, but a little like goats. They're far more independent and need less human intervention to thrive. I value my goats and sheep and enjoy the differences. After geeese, sheep are the easiest animals we raise and I appreciate how little work they take.​
     
  8. sweetshoplady

    sweetshoplady Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 4, 2008
    Venice, Florida
    Ozarkhen has a very good point there. It can take just a little bit for them to get to know you. You do have the fact that they are babies on your side.

    Yes, lots of pics as they grow up! They may be the start of a really nice flock of sheep for you.
     
  9. greyfields

    greyfields Overrun With Chickens

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    Quote:The first 6 months in lambs can be bad as far as flukes, parasites and cocci goes. So, extra vigelance makes sure they don't have any setbacks which would make you have to breed late.
     
  10. ozark hen

    ozark hen Living My Dream

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    I just told dh about your new additions, he said, "shoot, all she has to do is treat them like she does the rest of her animals and they will be following her around like puppy dogs, no problem at all". My dh KNOWS THESE THINGS. [​IMG]
     

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