Live Earth Humate? and my own feed recipe

Discussion in 'Feeding & Watering Your Flock' started by WildflowerJLH, Apr 24, 2011.

  1. WildflowerJLH

    WildflowerJLH Chillin' With My Peeps

    Does anyone know the benefits of including humate in chicken feed? I am working on my own recipe for feed, based on what I have reasonable access to. Modesto Milling includes it in their feed.

    As of right now, this is what my mix looks like. Please let me know if you see anything big missing!

    Parts Protien %
    sunflower 14 26.3 368.2
    wheat 19.5 12.5 243.75
    Flax 13 37 481
    kelp 18 8.5 153
    peas/beans 14 24.5 343
    milo 19 9 171
    DE 1
    redmond conditioner 1.5

    100 1759.95

    Overall protien 17.56% (too high?)
     
  2. WildflowerJLH

    WildflowerJLH Chillin' With My Peeps

    Forgot to add that oyster shell is offered separately. This is a feed for free ranging chickens, but I am considering it for the freedom rangers that I have coming, too (they will be tractored).
     
  3. Arielle

    Arielle Chicken Obsessed

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    What is earth humate? A new one to me.
     
  4. WildflowerJLH

    WildflowerJLH Chillin' With My Peeps

    I THINK that Live Earth is the brand and humate is the product. I think I am gonna e-mail Modesto Milling to ask why they add it. I can't find anything on the Live Earth website that indicates using this as a feed supplement.
     
  5. Arielle

    Arielle Chicken Obsessed

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    I'm curious what it is. it sounds like dirt. What's the benefit of adding dirt to feed????????? GL, hope you get an answer.
     
  6. WoodlandWoman

    WoodlandWoman Overrun With Chickens

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    I took a quick look and the first thing that popped out was that it had 70 trace minerals in it. Kelp is also good for providing trace minerals. I don't know how they compare.
     
  7. Speceider

    Speceider Chillin' With My Peeps

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    The problem with your mix as I see it is that I cannot assess it. I don't know what the metabolizable energy of the mix is (ME is what will determine the amount the bird eats), and the p[rotein doesn't mean much without a breakdown of the amino acid content. The protein quality of a diet is limited by the limiting amino acid. If the amino acids are not in the proper ratios, all excess protein will be excreted. I've tested diets (single grains) with mallards and has similar protein retention on 70% protein and 14% protein.

    Clint
     
  8. WildflowerJLH

    WildflowerJLH Chillin' With My Peeps

    Quote:If you can share how to calculate ME, I would be happy to work on it.
     
  9. Speceider

    Speceider Chillin' With My Peeps

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    You have to know what the ME is for each component. ME is measured by determining the gross energy in the food (using a Bomb calorimeter), measure the amount eaten, measure the amount of feces produced in a 24 hr period, and the amount of energy in the feces (again using bomb calorimetry) . That gives you apparent ME (not True ME). I normally just use apparent because I'm not convinced the Sibbald Method used for True actually gives you true, but that's a longer discussion.

    Some texts, like the older versions of Milt Scott's "Nutrition of the Chicken" list the ME and amino acid composition of different feed stuffs, but I know he lists several varieties of wheat, such as hard Red, and you don't list the variety.

    When you have all those, you need to balance the other nutrients, such as amino acids, at the appropriate ratios to assure they receive enough.

    That's why it's easiest to used a commercial feed. They're done the analyses, and usually use a least-cost program to produce a feed that meets the needs at the minimal cost.

    Clint
     
  10. Speceider

    Speceider Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,169
    79
    161
    Apr 4, 2011
    You have to know what the ME is for each component. ME is measured by determining the gross energy in the food (using a Bomb calorimeter), measure the amount eaten, measure the amount of feces produced in a 24 hr period, and the amount of energy in the feces (again using bomb calorimetry) . That gives you apparent ME (not True ME). I normally just use apparent because I'm not convinced the Sibbald Method used for True actually gives you true, but that's a longer discussion.

    Amino acid content is usually measured using High Pressure Liquid Chromotagraphy (HPLC).

    Some texts, like the older versions of Milt Scott's "Nutrition of the Chicken" or the NRC "Nutrient Requirements for Poultry" list the ME and amino acid composition of different feed stuffs, but I know he lists several varieties of wheat, such as hard Red, and you don't list the variety.

    When you have all those, you need to balance the other nutrients, such as amino acids, at the appropriate ratios to assure they receive enough.

    That's why it's easiest to used a commercial feed. They're done the analyses, and usually use a least-cost program to produce a feed that meets the needs at the minimal cost.

    Clint
     

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