Livestock Guardian Dog Questions

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by cityfarmer12, Nov 27, 2014.

  1. cityfarmer12

    cityfarmer12 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Ok, so those of you that have a Livestock Guardian Dog(s), I have a few questions.
    1) What do you consider the best breed and why?
    2) Do they bark all night? I live in the city, and have neighbors, so if they do i can't get one.
    3) If they do, is their a way to train them not too?

    Thanks in advance for any answers
     
  2. mymilliefleur

    mymilliefleur Keeper of the Flock

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    Hi,
    We have Great Pyrenees, and Great Pyrenees crosses. We have never had a problem with them being disrespectful to any of our animals. (cows, sheep, horses, ducks, turkeys, and chickens.) They are very loyal dogs and have excellent personality's. They may bark all night, depending on what type of predator's you have around, or traffic, etc. We live in the country ourselves but we have Friends who keep their dogs in Urban areas with out a problem. (I guess it depends on your neighbors) some dogs are not as loud as others, so also keep that in mind.
    Some people train their dogs not to bark with shock colors, but that seems a little harsh. for more ideas, you could get this book:
    http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/liv...624&isbn=9781577790624&kpid=9781577790624&r=1
    It's a great book.
     
  3. RedRidge

    RedRidge Chillin' With My Peeps

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    We breed and raise Italian Maremma. One thing you need to understand about lgds is that they may need guidance as a pup, but other than basic manners should not require "training". Their guarding is all by instinct and if you feel compelled to train anything "into" them or "out of" them, then you don't have the right dog for you.
    Ninety percent of the people I talk to who think they need an lgd really need only a deterrent. That's good news for many as deterrents are pretty easy to come by. If you're in the city a deterrent is wiser as barking for lgd's is a natural thing and should never be discouraged (the only exception to this would be nonsense barking - something youngsters sometimes do when getting their wheels). It should NEVER be discouraged, so if barking is a problem then an lgd is not the solution for you.
     
  4. donrae

    donrae Hopelessly Addicted Premium Member

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    You're in the city you say...how much space do you have? Give more details of your set up and what you're needing a dog for. I'm very hesitant with a dog of this type in an urban envrionment.
     
  5. cityfarmer12

    cityfarmer12 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    thanks! Yeah, i knew about shock collars, but they do seem a little harsh, especially when the dog is just doing their job. one neighbor has some dogs, and they bark during the day, but not at night, and i don't want to keep the neighbors awake. I'll check that book out. :)

    what kind of deterrent? I don't mind barking at all, but if they were barking nonstop all night then there could be a problem with the neighbors.
    We have 2+ acres that they would have free run of. We have all kinds of animals (chickens, turkeys, water fowl, rabbits, goats, etc) and also have all kinds of predators that are really bold. I've had foxes attack chickens while i am standing right there. We were in the country for a while, and had no predator problems until moving to the city. [​IMG] We have also lost food to deer and stuff, and the presence of a big dog would most likely deter them.
     
  6. mymilliefleur

    mymilliefleur Keeper of the Flock

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    I don't use shock collars ether, since we live in the country, we don't have a problem with them barking. Do you have a neighbor that you know would have a problem with it? I think maybe if you explained to the neighbors about the new dogs, and how you've been losing chickens (some eggs helps with this) the neighbors may have no problem with the barking they may even be happy about it. [​IMG]
     
  7. cityfarmer12

    cityfarmer12 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    yeah, i'm not a fan of bark collars. no, we actually have really cool neighbors. On one side we have a family that already has dogs, and their little girls (4 and 7) love to come see all the animals. [​IMG] I just want to be nice and not keep them awake all night from a barking dog. We used to have a neighbor that left their dog in the backyard all night, and it drove my parents crazy cause it barked all the time. I would rather stay on our neighbors good side. LOL, eggs are totally a good bargaining tool [​IMG]That's a pretty good idea. :) Thanks
     
  8. mymilliefleur

    mymilliefleur Keeper of the Flock

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  9. RedRidge

    RedRidge Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Lgd's are not what i would recommend on only 2 acres, especially if you have a concern about barking. An lgd should never be discouraged from barking - it is one of their tools in their tool box. What I meant by a deterrent is a general farm dog. Most people do not need more than a general farm dog to deter minor predators (fox, hawks and other dogs) and to discourage coons and deer. Many good farm dogs exist and can be found in pure bred and crosses and will only cost a few hundred dollars.
    That said, an lgd, bonded tightly and bred to protect against all predators flying, 4 legged, and 2 legged including packs will protect with its life and be willing to take a life if they seem it necessary. It's a totally different relationship and working style than a farm dog. An lgd on small acreage can be a liability. It's simply more dog than what a lot of people need.
    Keep in mind that just because a dog is a certain breed does not it "is" an lgd. For instance, a border collie is a herding breed, but very few really herd well. The same can be said for many lgd breeds.
    The opposite is also true... you can't teach a non herding breed to herd. To move sheep? Yes, but not herd. And non lgd breeds can be "taught" to be a deterrent but cannot be taught to be an lgd. There is a big difference.
    Research is necessary to get exactly what would work best for you.
     
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  10. donrae

    donrae Hopelessly Addicted Premium Member

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    Thank you for touting the benefits of a good farmdog, not necessarily a lgd! I've had generic BBDs (Big Black Dogs) for years and have had no predator losses, despite being in a raccoon and fox heavy area. My current dog, Roscoe, was a freebie when his former owner died.....one of the better dogs I've ever had for predator deterrent

    [​IMG]

    He does bark at night when appropriate, that's when we head out with the shotgun to see what's hanging around. He's also very people oriented and a companion, something a lgd isn't necessarily.
     

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