Logistics of being a "breeder"

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by Lil Mucket, Aug 29, 2013.

  1. Lil Mucket

    Lil Mucket Out Of The Brooder

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    Jun 23, 2010
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    So I've never been interested in becoming a breeder UNTIL NOW.

    I just hatched out my first batch of Cream Legbars that I got here locally and I am in love. Normally I just keep a mixed flock and be done with it, but now I'm starting to think along the lines of isolating breeds and whatnot.

    SO how the heck is that done logistically? Anybody have a setup they can point me to? Truth be told I know a lot of rare birds are just kept together in trios but every rooster I've ever seen would shred that many hens in a matter of days. We try to keep a 10 hen per rooster ratio here to protect the hens from being used too heavily by the roosters, but I'm seeing a lot of people talk about trios and quads. As it stands now I have enough hens for one rooster but I'm also thinking about getting into Welsummers (and when I make it rich, some Ayam Cemani!).

    Or is there an effective way to just keep the roos separate until you want them to go fertilize the hens? Is it possible to keep the roos together? If you isolate them instead, won't they get lonely?

    sorry - I'm full of questions :) Backyard stuff I understand, but this breeder stuff I'm still trying to figure out. Since this breed is so rare here in the States I really want to do this the right way.
     
    Last edited: Aug 29, 2013
  2. GD91

    GD91 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    You could get a mating saddle to stop a cockerel shredding a hen if you are keeping small groups or a pair [​IMG]
     
  3. centrarchid

    centrarchid Chicken Obsessed

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    Holts Summit, Missouri
    I go to an extreme to use single mating where even mother is known with certainty. Each bird is kept in a 4' x 5' pen, at very least on hen side. With dominiques the rooster is simply moved between pens with a hen of his breeding group. Hen is exposed to rooster at most every 3rd day. With games that are more easily trained, the cock and a hen to be covered are released together in a common area for a few minutes while I tend other birds. Then each is enticed back into respective cage. Process is repeated with another hen following day. With games I can do at least four matings in an hour as everyone else is tended to. You got to be on your toes in respect roosters wanting to fight through pens but with a little practice the roosters keep mind in game of covering hens.
     
  4. Lil Mucket

    Lil Mucket Out Of The Brooder

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    Jun 23, 2010
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    Oh now that's interesting! Single matings, huh. I do suppose it depends on each rooster as well. What I'm thinking is for the winter to keep hens and roos separate and then in the summertime separate them out into mobile pens. I suppose it depends on how many pullets and roos I get from my next hatching, whether I do the visitation thing or keep roos in pens with enough hens to keep him occupied.
     
  5. centrarchid

    centrarchid Chicken Obsessed

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    Holts Summit, Missouri
    My breeding pens are small and mobile as well. During production season they are moved about as if little chicken tractors. Hen pens are as shown below while cock pens are generally taller. They covered to provide shade.


    [​IMG]


    During winter pens kept closer together as in touching and cocks are never adjacent.
     

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