Long story but any info would be appreciated.

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Chickenmanjim7, Mar 3, 2017.

  1. Chickenmanjim7

    Chickenmanjim7 Chillin' With My Peeps

    123
    8
    61
    Sep 16, 2015
    Aberdeen, Washington
    I recently added a new rooster which upset the pecking order in my flock. It moved a chicken that wasn't there to begin with, to the bottom. She hasn't taken it well and seems to be losing some weight. Her comb has been blodied on different occasions and now it is pale and some of the areas that had cuts it is almost white. I am sure this is just due to it healing, but suggestions to healing her up and maybe perking her up would be appreciated. Also, I have read all the info on this page and I still haven't made a decision.

    Should I worm my chickens? And if so, what is the easiest method and how long do I need to destroy the eggs?
     
  2. Wyorp Rock

    Wyorp Rock Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

    10,227
    3,604
    406
    Sep 20, 2015
    Southern N.C. Mountains
    Can you post some photos?
    What type of food treats do you feed?
    How old is she?
    If she is old enough to lay eggs, when was the last time she laid an egg?
    Do you have vet care available?

    You may want to place her in a cage or kennel inside the run so she can have some peace while healing. This somewhat protects her, but she will still be with the flock. She can have her own food/water and recuperate.

    Most injuries to the comb will heal fairly well barring infection. You can apply some triple antibiotic ointment or Vetericyn to any cuts/wounds if you wish.

    Changes in pecking order can happen all the time, but if she is taking this hard and has taken a beating as well, you may want to examine/monitor her closely - she may be ill - chickens can be brutal to ones that are weak or sick. Check her for lice/mites and treat if needed. Watch to see if she is drinking and eating. Check her crop at night when she goes to roost, then first thing in the a.m. before eating/drinking. Crop should be full at night/empty in the a.m. Feel her abdomen for any signs of bloat, swelling that could be an indication of reproductive disorders.

    Offer some poultry vitamins to her water, feed her normal feed and give some extra protein like egg, tuna, mackerel or meat.

    Having a fecal sample tested for worms and cocci would be a good idea. Get a sample from several places then have it tested.
    If the vet confirms worms, then use a de-wormer that he/she recommends or you can use Valbazen 1/2 ml orally and then repeated in 10 days for each chicken or Fenbendazole (Safeguard, Panacur) at 1/4 ml per pound for 5 days in a row. Withdrawal (throw away period is 14days after last dosage given).

    Keep us posted.
     
  3. Chickenmanjim7

    Chickenmanjim7 Chillin' With My Peeps

    123
    8
    61
    Sep 16, 2015
    Aberdeen, Washington
    Sorry I haven't gotten back sooner. But I took you advice and had a fecal float done and it appears she has some cocci. So she is on corid and hear is hoping she feels better soon.
     
  4. Wyorp Rock

    Wyorp Rock Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

    10,227
    3,604
    406
    Sep 20, 2015
    Southern N.C. Mountains
    I'm glad that you were able to get some testing done.

    I hope she starts to improve.

    Here's some tips on using Corid:
    Dosage is 1 1/2 teaspoons Corid powder per gallon or 2 teaspoons of 9.6% Corid liquid per gallon.
    Give for 5-7 days - make sure this is the ONLY water available during that time period. Mix a fresh batch at least once a day.

    After she finishes treatment offer some poultry vitamins and probiotics/plain yogurt.

    Please keep us posted.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by