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Looking for Australian Saddleback Tumbler pigeons

Discussion in 'Pigeons and Doves' started by primalpotter, Dec 1, 2008.

  1. primalpotter

    primalpotter New Egg

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    May 22, 2008
    My son has three Australian saddleback tumblers he got at an auction in Hillsdale, Michigan. We built them an eight sided dovecote that looks like a cupola on top of a platform that used to be a play yard swingset/slide tower when the kids were little (maybe five feet off the ground.)

    They are healthy birds, and very pretty. He lets them out every morning to fly, and they come home in the evening to be shut in. Two seem to be a pair, though they never nested last summer (maybe too young.)

    He'd like to find a mate for the third bird, and add a few more to his coop. We're in Northwest Ohio. Any ideas?

    Also -- is there any chance the third bird will bring home a mate from the wild? It obviously wouldn't be a saddleback, but at least it wouldn't be lonely.

    My husband and I have thought about adding some white homers to the mix, as well. Is there a way to hand raise those so you don't have to keep anyone captive?

    My only concern is the hawk... we have coopers and red tailed hawks in the metroparks near our neighborhood and once in a while they come after my chickens or chase a pigeon. The really pick out the light colored ones. Still, my kid wouldn't want birds if they couldn't fly, and the chickens seem to know when to head under the bushes and hide. We haven't lost a chicken to a hawk in years.

    Thanks in advance for any ideas!
     
  2. FrChuckW

    FrChuckW Father to all, Dad to none

    Sep 7, 2008
    Louisville, KY
    Check out the National Pigeon Association Website and see if they have a breeder referral for that breed. If you get the Homers you want to get them as young unflown birds so that they will home to your coop. Older birds that have been flown will try and home to their original coop.

    It is possible that the other bird may entice a stray pigeon to follow him/her home. Usually wild pigeons will congregate in flocks around food/nesting sites that offer some protection from predators/weather, etc. However the reverse is also possible, the wild pigeons may entice your extra bird away to join up with them.
     
  3. primalpotter

    primalpotter New Egg

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    May 22, 2008
    Thanks! I'll go check.

    Can birds be shipped, or should I be looking within driving range?
     

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