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Looking for info on creating buff columbian cochins.

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by horsechick, Dec 5, 2010.

  1. horsechick

    horsechick Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Nov 14, 2007
    Eaton, Ohio
    Hi,
    Please point me in the right direction if there is already a post regarding this.
    Do you use white columbian cochins and buff cochins to create the buff columbians?
    Thanks so much!
    Angela
     
  2. tadkerson

    tadkerson Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 19, 2008
    Missouri
    Quote:Neither of the variaties are good candidates for producing columbian birds. What variaties can you obtain?

    Tim
     
  3. DANNY

    DANNY Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 27, 2009
    GAINESVILLE, GEORGIA
    That's how I made mine. I alsop made blue columbian and blue buff columbian.
    Bluie buff columbian.
    [​IMG]
    buff columbian
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    Quote:
     
  4. RAREROO

    RAREROO Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 22, 2009
    Alapaha, Ga
    Quote:Neither of the variaties are good candidates for producing columbian birds. What variaties can you obtain?

    Tim

    Did you see the white Columbian part Tim ? even though horsechick, the color isnt called White Columbian, it is Silver Columbian. But yes, breeding Buff on Silver Columbian hens would give sexlinks that the pullets should be buff with with weak columbian ticking, the males would be split for both Silver and Gold and would look more silver when a yellowish tinge. Breed those offsring together will give some pure buff males and breeding back to the well marked Columbian to give better columbian markings. and work on them from there. But you would need to learn how to breed sexlinked Gold and Silver back and forth to make sure you dont lose the Gold while breeding back for better markings.

    If you could find a Golden laced to breed to Buff, that should also work. ( I had a Buff Orp roo breed a SLW hen and got a weak colored buff columbian pullet) Using the upside of using Golden Laced with Buff is you would be getting pure gold chicks each time and not have to bother with the Silvers, for a while anyway, the downside would be the possible messiness of the incomplete lacing when breeding with laced birds put that one pullet I hatched didnt have any messy incomplete lacing markings.
     
  5. horsechick

    horsechick Chillin' With My Peeps

    892
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    Nov 14, 2007
    Eaton, Ohio
    Hi,
    Thanks all,
    I have only seen the white/silver ones listed as just plain "columbian" cochins. Never seen them listed as silver.
    In getting colors it is easier to get the "silver" ones, buff for sure, blue.
    Thanks,
    Angela
     
  6. Coopa Cabana

    Coopa Cabana My Coop Runneth Over . . .

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    Aug 30, 2009
    Colorado
    My Coop
    In your sig line, it says you have already have Buff Columbian Bantam Cochins. Are you trying to improve the coloring in the ones you already have, or create the color in LF? Sometimes it helps if we know what your goal is?
     
  7. horsechick

    horsechick Chillin' With My Peeps

    892
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    Nov 14, 2007
    Eaton, Ohio
    Hi,
    I only have a couple, (not enough to hatch enough eggs to further my coloring.) I would like to have more, (I just lost one hen yesterday.) Unfortunately not very many people have them, I have not had any luck with buying hatching eggs of this variety. I have bought a few started birds but they are few and far between.
    I also notice on these it seems I will have to either AI them or trim their bums down to help with fertility.
    Hope that helps some.
    I am also working on my mille fleurs and need more stock.

    Figured it would be easier for me to get what I need and create my own flocks.
    Thanks
     
    Last edited: Dec 6, 2010
  8. cochinman2005

    cochinman2005 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 19, 2008
    Virginia
    Quote:Angela,
    If all else fails you can work them that way. Buff male X Columbian females. All of the females from that cross will be Buff Columbians (more or less). Less actually. You've take the pattern and diluted it by 50% essentially. You will get some leakage showing in the females most likely and all the males will be brassy Columbians although poorly marked most likely. You could take one of the Brassy males and breed it to it's sister, or breed a Buff male to the f1 females, keeping in mind that your markings will be lacking, in the f2, since they are already diluted in f1. With f3 you could take the best ground colored f2 male and breed it to a regular Columbian female, and again the pullets should be more or less Buff Columbian and better marked, but the males will be be brassy Columbians. For f4 you would breed one of the f2 males to the best colored f3 females and then go from there.

    I raise both Buff Columbian and Columbian Cochins. When I started with the Buff Columbians I didn't have a male, and so bred a Buff Cochin male X Buff Columbian female to get a couple cockerels with at least some pattern. The Columbians have better pattern and I also took one of those resulting cockerels and bred it to a Columbian, discarding all the cockerels, and just kept at it. I have a few pictures of the a couple of those cockerels on my website, but will try to take some more current pictures so you can see how they are looking now.

    Tom
     
  9. RAREROO

    RAREROO Chillin' With My Peeps

    4,516
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    Jul 22, 2009
    Alapaha, Ga
    Quote:Yeah it is usually just called Columbian but the color is genetically called Silver Columbian. There is Silver Columbian, Buff Columbian, and Red Columbian.

    If you have a bantam Buff Columbian or a Bantam Mille Fluer roo already, if you could breed him to Columbian hens then that would give you well marked Buff Columbian pullets in the first generation. Or you could us the Buff roo but the markings would need some work.
     
  10. DANNY

    DANNY Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 27, 2009
    GAINESVILLE, GEORGIA
    Tom , in hindsight thats probably the best way but the way I made mine was columbian male x buff hen which produced some columbian leaking buff which were bred back together and produced the first buff columbian. Keep in mind I did'nt hatch but a couple each time.
    Quote:Angela,
    If all else fails you can work them that way. Buff male X Columbian females. All of the females from that cross will be Buff Columbians (more or less). Less actually. You've take the pattern and diluted it by 50% essentially. You will get some leakage showing in the females most likely and all the males will be brassy Columbians although poorly marked most likely. You could take one of the Brassy males and breed it to it's sister, or breed a Buff male to the f1 females, keeping in mind that your markings will be lacking, in the f2, since they are already diluted in f1. With f3 you could take the best ground colored f2 male and breed it to a regular Columbian female, and again the pullets should be more or less Buff Columbian and better marked, but the males will be be brassy Columbians. For f4 you would breed one of the f2 males to the best colored f3 females and then go from there.

    I raise both Buff Columbian and Columbian Cochins. When I started with the Buff Columbians I didn't have a male, and so bred a Buff Cochin male X Buff Columbian female to get a couple cockerels with at least some pattern. The Columbians have better pattern and I also took one of those resulting cockerels and bred it to a Columbian, discarding all the cockerels, and just kept at it. I have a few pictures of the a couple of those cockerels on my website, but will try to take some more current pictures so you can see how they are looking now.

    Tom
     

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