Looking for people in Oxford Twp Michigan to help change the ordinance

Discussion in 'Local Chicken Laws & Ordinances (and how to change' started by Soap Junkie, Nov 5, 2010.

  1. Soap Junkie

    Soap Junkie Out Of The Brooder

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    Nov 5, 2010
    Oxford Mi
    I live in Oxford Michigan and I have been seriously considering getting a chicken coop. I have been reading a lot on this site on how to build the coop, the run and take care of your chickens, it never dawned on me to check to see if I could actually keep them. I am on a bit of a rural road and across the street (same road mind you) is farming land. I have 1 acre and today I just found out that I can not have chickens unless I am on 2 1/2 acres! Now I am mad! My daughter works for the Oxford leader and said that she saw an article about a women in Oxford that is going to try to change the ordinance and I want in for sure so I am hoping that you are on this site and answer! She did state that she saw this site listed in the article so I am giving it a shot! Hope you are here! If not, then I will keep reading on what it takes to get the ordinance changed.

    Have a beautiful day!
     
  2. J.Pryce

    J.Pryce Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 22, 2010
    Ypsilanti
    I am in Ypsilanti. I'm in Superior Township so there is no problem. I do know that folks in the CITY of Ypsilanti & Ann Arbor can have chickens. 2 1/2 Acres is ridiculous. A 1 acre parcel is plenty of room for chickens. Do some research, get some experts & take your arguement to Oxford.
     
  3. Soap Junkie

    Soap Junkie Out Of The Brooder

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    Nov 5, 2010
    Oxford Mi
    Thank you for the response. I do think it is rediculous too. I know that there is a Lady here in town that wants help with this so I am searching for her. Figure two heads are better then none! I am not even 100% sure that raising chickens is for me or not, but I want the choice if I do!
     
  4. JackieHawley

    JackieHawley New Egg

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    Nov 8, 2010
    Hi,
    I'm from Lake Orion but moved to Lapeer County- less rules:) I also sell real estate in the Orion/Oxford/Clarkston areas so know a bit about zoning. First thing you need to do is go to the township, find out your zoning and get a copy of the ordinances for your specific zoning. Oxford is a little quirky. Zoning around Waterstone got changed a while back to not allow any livestock no matter the property size. If you truely need 2 1/2 acres, that's probably for the first chicken. You may need additional acreage for additional chickens.

    After you find out what you are zoned and if the ordinance really doesn't allow for chickens on an acre, nicely ask how you would go about getting a variance. When I lived in Orion, I leased property from a neighbor (on paper) to have the legal amount of property to keep my grandpa's horses at my house in the summer (I only, legally had enough land for my 1 horse). If you are next to someone on a couple acres you can lease say an acre and a half for a dollar a year and do the same with the neighbor on the other side if necessary.

    Hope this helps.
     
  5. dianaross77

    dianaross77 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Oct 10, 2010
    Grand Blanc, MI
    Please read up on the Michigan Right To Farm Act. There are several threads on here about it. It really isn't necessary to change any ordinances in the state of MI. We already have a statewide law that protects our farming heritage.
     
  6. JackieHawley

    JackieHawley New Egg

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    Nov 8, 2010
    Michigan Right to Farm Act is not exempt from zoning. It is also meant to protect farmers, not the person who wants to raise food in their back yard. If zoning didn't matter then a person in a subdivision could raise cattle- they can't.
     
  7. dianaross77

    dianaross77 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Oct 10, 2010
    Grand Blanc, MI
    Last edited: Jan 7, 2011
  8. Riverdale

    Riverdale Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 20, 2008
    Riverdale, MI
    Quote:MRTFA will protect an established ag producer from urban sprawl,
    NOT a new producer in an area where zoning preceeds it.

    The Michigan Right to Farm Act, P.A. 93, was enacted in 1981 to provide farmers with protection from nuisance lawsuits. This state statute authorizes the Michigan Commission of Agriculture to develop and adopt Generally Accepted Agricultural and Management Practices (GAAMPs) for farms and farm operations in Michigan. These voluntary practices are based on available technology and scientific research to promote sound environmental stewardship and help maintain a farmer's right to farm.​
     
  9. GINNYP

    GINNYP New Egg

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    Mar 30, 2013
    I too live in Oxford and would like to change the ordinance. I would like to find out about this other lady in town. There is some lady over by Baldwin and oakwood who I think has chickens I want to know how she does it.
     
  10. wingless

    wingless Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jan 11, 2011
    Ann Arbor, MI
    I realize I am replying to an old post here, but I want to reiterate what diannaross77 said - Right to Farm does protect everyone in Michigan with a commercial operation. The information about the law that is quoted above was true in 1981, but the law has been amended three times since then. The last time was in 1999, and at that time new language was added to specifically prohibit any local government from interfering with commercial farming operations in Michigan, so long as they are (or become) compliant with the GAAMPS. It is very easy to meet both the commercial and the GAAMPS criteria, so everyone in Michigan who wants chickens should learn about what rights are provided by this law.

    One BYCer recently fought a court case over this issue, and the judge ruled in his favor last December. Another group of BYCers has attended every meeting of the Michigan Commission of Agriculture and Rural Development since last July, and are very involved in maintaining Right to Farm protection for all small farmers in Michigan. All of those events are chronicled on this thread: https://www.backyardchickens.com/t/182280/michigan-right-to-farm-law-what-does-it-mean/

    In any case, I wish you luck in getting chickens, whether by changing the ordinance or by claiming Right to Farm protection.
     

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