Looky what I [finally] caught!!

petchickenlover

Songster
11 Years
Sep 9, 2008
340
1
131
Little bugger [and his mom] caught 2 of my ducks when they didn't go in the other day. Ever since they've been wandering around here eating scraps from the chickens, dropped grain,etc. All the horses and goats were absolutely terrified of him,even if they're ten times bigger


 

SilkieBantams

Songster
8 Years
Sep 23, 2011
1,430
12
131
Houston, TX
Hen is cute! :

i'd tke him 30 miles away, or to a city near you so he dosn't bother you.

That will create a problem for someone else.​
 

Imp

All things share the same breath- Chief Seattle
11 Years
Sep 7, 2008
14,453
171
318
The Emerald City
My Coop
What an odd looking raccoon. Almost looks like a raccoon/fox cross. I'm guessing he's all muddy and that's not how they all look around you.

Imp
 

petchickenlover

Songster
11 Years
Sep 9, 2008
340
1
131
Quote:Yeah he's just muddy.
it was raining+he was trying to dig his way out. I almost thought he was a opossum or some funky cat at first! He's going to be taken a long ways away from civilization, down a logging road somewhere. . . sadly i'm not willing to kill something even if he did kill some of my birds. I hate that they're so cute!
 

mstricer

Crowing
Feb 12, 2009
7,502
217
366
Ohio
Hen is cute! :

i'd tke him 30 miles away, or to a city near you so he dosn't bother you.

You are not aloud to do that. Just shot and bury.​
 

bobbi-j

Crossing the Road
Mar 15, 2010
14,887
29,114
982
On the MN prairie.
Before you do him the "kindness" relocating him, please consider this:

Releasing is a quick way to spread diseases, when you release you are disrupting the carrying capacity, (The carrying capacity of a biological species in an environment is the maximum population size of the species that the environment can sustain indefinitely, given the food, habitat, water and other necessities available in the environment. In population biology, carrying capacity is defined as the environment's maximal load) so when you take an animal from its environment (your chicken coop) and release it to another, you are dooming the raccoon anyway, Its a stranger to the area and will get in territorial fights, get wounded and possibly spread diseases. Bear foot is right, if you're not going to kill it, don't trap it..... Sad but true.

And this:

Most wildlife biologists do not support "relocating" any animal. There is good evidence that doing this usually leads to the death of the animal involved, because you have removed it from an area it knows and placed it in to an area it knows nothing about. They can't just walk away in to some forest utopia and live happily ever after. Instead they need to find food and water, along with shelter and safety in a place they have never set foot in. They are strangers in a strange place, the residents of their own species are unlikely to welcome them and instead attack. The relocated animal has to defend itself too, combined with the rest of the issues, resulting in a highly stressed and frightened animal. They are extremely vulnerable to starvation or being dinner for some predator. All of this is ironic because the person doing the relocating did it thinking it was an act of kindness.
Instead of a quick death, they end up suffering physically and mentally before the inevitable end comes.

Both comments made on another thread by othe BYCers. I can't take credit for either, but I do agree with both statements. There is not a national shortage of raccoons. One less would be a good thing.
 

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