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lost a girl to eggbinding and peritonitis prevention?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by coldinnh, Jul 7, 2011.

  1. coldinnh

    coldinnh Chillin' With My Peeps

    155
    1
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    May 13, 2010
    NH
    Noticed my girl was a little slow moving, pecking (little pecking only - not eating) at food - did the eye dropper of liquids (electrolytes, sugar and nutri drench) tried scrambled eggs etc when I noticed she was not getting down for scratch. Did the 20 min soaks, the massage, the vent manipulation, etc...took her to the vet on Tuesday (my vet out of town until today) and the Emergency Vet referred me back to my vet. (Of course it was a holiday weekend). [​IMG]
    Long story short - took her in on Tues- vet talked about removing ovi-duct, etc.... asked for oxytocin, tube feeding, IV fluids and xray to ensure that was what we were dealing with. Was told that she was a chicken and as I have 21 how much really did I want to spend...explained that I had paid nothing for my cat and have spent more on him then a couple of bucks. Explained that I saw the chicken as a pet just like someone with a macaw or parrot and felt it necessary to do what I could.
    Next morning called and she was doing great - Vet thought it may be a viral/bacterial tummy bug, as he did not see anything on the xray or feel anything - but when I called back for an update later I was put off a few times (vet was busy etc) until I got the news that after he did an ultrsound he noticed two eggs stuck and she had developed perotinius. After reading on here I knew that the outlook was grim and the with peritionitus it was pretty much a death sentence. Vet talked about removing eggs, etc surgically but the prospect was not good. Explained that I had called in the am not wanting to go ahead with the hystorectomy as I didn't think she could handle the stress of surgery. Vet concurred that the stress would be great and she would probable pass during the surgery. He said she did not look good and I asked that he put her down and I would be up to collect her that afternoon. [​IMG] [​IMG]
    I read all the postings I could on what to do- but that did not seem to help so how do I get ahold of the stuff in some of the postings the oxcytocine or calicum gluconate? My leghorns are breed to be producers genetically and will have a predisposition I guess. I dont my girls to suffer.
    I know I should have taken her in during the weekend and asked that the Er Vet try something but the other vet did give her oxcy without success.
    If I do get oxy what is teh doising?
    What about blue cohosh - I habe seen that at health food stores...
     
  2. willkatdawson

    willkatdawson Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 31, 2008
    Ga
    I'm so sorry for your loss. I went through the same thing with my sweet little BR Futter. She was very ill and seemed to get better then last week, I knew the time had come to relieve her suffering. I had my large animal vet come by and put her down for me. I'm not sure if there is any prevention, but I'd like to see what responses you get. I do know that Flutter had layed paper bag looking eggs for quite some time before she stopped laying all together. I mean what I say when I say "I know how you feel."
     
  3. bawkbawkbawk

    bawkbawkbawk Chillin' With My Peeps

    Just went through this experience with my beloved EE, who survived thanks to prompt (and expensive!) [​IMG] veterinary attention.

    I posted here:https://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewtopic.php?id=530128

    and here: https://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewtopic.php?id=531317

    And
    posted about it on my blog: http://polloplayer.wordpress.com

    The short version: I noticed she was slowing her gait for a few days and then stopped wanting to move completely. I rushed her to the vet, they were able to save her with antibiotics and Lupron injection, which will have to be repeated four, five or more times, I think. She's acting normal, eating, enjoying her little free-range life. Our wallet is considerably lighter, but what can I say, she's our favorite chicken. [​IMG]
     

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