low quality eggs from my Delaware

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by ellent, Mar 19, 2013.

  1. ellent

    ellent Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 2, 2010
    Columbia, MO
    I'm not certain if this is the right place to post, but I'll give it a try. My Delaware hen, who is close to a year old, and has been laying since the fall, lays eggs that are very thin-shelled compared to the other girls, and have a matte (as opposed to eggshell!) quality to them. What I mean is that they don't seem to have the same shiny smoothness that the other ladies' eggs have. So they seem to be a little permeable--when I boil them, they have a little air pocket at the end, and when it's wet like now, and the girls have muddy feet, the mud doesn't wash off easily the way it does off of the other eggs. She has access to all the same food that they do, and seems healthy, although she sometimes has some poop that cakes around her cloaca. She may be lowest in the pecking order, but she definitely gets adequate access to the food. I have tried worming. Sometimes, when the eggs are particularly thin-shelled, she seems to know, and lays them on the ground instead of in the nest box. Any ideas?
     
  2. BuffOrpington88

    BuffOrpington88 Non-Stop

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    Do they have access to oyster shells?
     
  3. ellent

    ellent Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 2, 2010
    Columbia, MO
    I give them a feed that says on the bag not to give additional calcium, and I feed them back their crushed shells, so I do not give oyster shell in addition.
     
  4. sumi

    sumi Égalité Staff Member

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    Rep of Ireland
    It sounds she has either a defective shell gland or a problem absorbing adequate calcium from her diet.
     
  5. BunkyB

    BunkyB Chillin' With My Peeps

    If the egg seems rough to the touch and thin shelled the first thought is calcium deficciency. As was mentioned before me try food processing the eggs as finely as you can as long as the pieces don't resemble egg. You can mix it in their food or if fine enough you could add some to the watering dishes as the goodness is there for all the hens to benefit from the calcium.
    Depending on where you are crushed oyster shell can be costly but it lasts a long time. Superb calcium there . Give it a shot and you should see a difference in the eggs soon enough. If the bird has been laying for a while and is nearing the end of the egg laying cycle prepping for a molt, the egg shells can become thin or even non existent (rubber egg) sometimes. The hens body is telling itself time to slow down and give the reproductive organs a break to revitalize itself. Don't be too concerned yet... Steve
     

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