Low to the ground coops

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by FlutterbyChicks, Jan 23, 2015.

  1. FlutterbyChicks

    FlutterbyChicks Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jan 21, 2015
    Hi everyone!! So....we just ordered 5 chicks to start our backyard chicken adventures. They are not due to arrive until the beginning of May, so we have time to think, plan, and build.

    We live in a very rural area, with lots of farms nearby. We have almost 2 acres of land. The neighbors behind us are Amish, with an 8 acre farm. The house at the beginning of our small street has two chickens, a peacock (I think), and two goats. However, our street is zoned as residential. Our township consists of both farmland as well as a regular little town. I asked the township, and was told we were not allowed any chickens, because we are zoned residential. But the response was very vague and ambiguous. So I had someone else ask for a copy of the ordinance and they were told that the township doesn't have an ordinance on chickens per say. Unless you are grandfathered in (which apparently the people on our street are grandfathered in, so that's why they're allowed), they're not allowed in a residential district. But that it's a complicated matter, best discussed in person. I've also seen other people, clearly in the residential area, owning chickens in plain sight.

    So what I take from that is that there really isn't anything saying they're not allowed. I did find a copy of our ordinances online, and there is nothing outright saying they're not allowed. It's very vague. So we decided to go ahead and do it. We have somewhere for the chickens to go if it ends up that we can't have them, they won't change it, etc. The place where the coop will be can't be seen from the street. The only neighbors that will even seen the coop are our friends and 100% okay with it.

    BUT, the location where we want to put it is behind our shed, which can be seen from a main township road. But only about 5 feet off the ground and higher, due to layout of the land. So what we want to do is build a shed that will house anywhere from 5-7 chickens (large breed), but be around 5 feet high. We are okay with doing a large square foot area to allow for more roaming since the roof won't be as high. We also want the floor of the coop off the ground, for several reasons. We will have a penned-in run for them, allowing for at least the recommended 10sq ft per bird.

    So does anyone have any coop pics that aren't super-high, but large enough for 5-7 hens? Thanks so much!!
     
  2. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Chicken Obsessed

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    Northwest Arkansas
    Can you expand the shed and make the expansion the chicken coop? Or put up a separate tall building that looks like a shed and not a coop from the street.

    You need a certain height in a coop. If it is off the ground, you need to be able to get under there if the chickens have access or you need it high enough that mice and rats don’t set up housekeeping under there. Figure out the height of the floor, then how high any bedding might be. Then position your nests. Next, put your roost clearly higher than anything you don’t want them to roost on, which usually means the nests. Then put your ventilation over the chicken’s heads when they are on the roost. You want air movement over their heads but you don’t want a breeze to directly hit the chickens when they are sleeping in winter.

    With all that I think it will be challenging to have a low coop, so hide it in plain sight. Just don’t write “chicken coop” on the street side.
     
  3. FlutterbyChicks

    FlutterbyChicks Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jan 21, 2015
    Lol, yea, that could definitely be a give away that something is up.

    That may be a good idea to expand the shed. It does seem like it'd be tough to make it low enough to allow for roosting, ventilation, etc. We may be better off making it look shed-like.
     

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