Lymphoid Leukosis Question

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by katelk, Jan 6, 2015.

  1. katelk

    katelk Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 6, 2013
    White Bluff, TN
    I have done a ton of research on this topic since I lost a pullet to this disease.

    I just have some questions that I want to make sure I have clear in my head:

    Can this be transmitted (leading to fatality) to adult chickens, or are chicks and young birds most likely to be effected?

    I ask because the batch of chicks I hatched are the ones where the symptoms/death is coming from. All of my older birds seem fine even though they were obviously exposed/are now carriers. (I got rid of the breeding hens that produced the sick chicks)

    I am curious as to whether or not I should be worried about my 1+ year olds being exposed.

    Also, I am wondering if there is a period of time I need to keep any new chicks away from carriers.


    I read that after a hen's first molt, the likelihood of passing LL to chicks through egg is reduced by 95%. I plan on not breeding any pullets, but other than that, what is the first step in breeding for resistance?

    Thanks!
     
  2. Runamuckranch1

    Runamuckranch1 Out Of The Brooder

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    Dec 15, 2014
    I have been losing my younger chickens but not older ones, what are the symptoms of Lymphoid Leukosis ?
     
  3. enola

    enola Overrun With Chickens

    Runamuck are you still losing chickens? Have you treated for coccidia yet?
     
  4. katelk

    katelk Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 6, 2013
    White Bluff, TN

    LL is known as "the wasting disease". Literally the only symptom that has been noticeable for me before immanent death is the bird losing a lot of weight. The first pullet to die was walking slowly about 2 weeks prior to death (turned out to be a huge tumor that took up most of her abdomen) and then within a week or so went from seemingly normal weight to just basically bones and feathers.
    The one I suspect is now dying is wasting. Still eating normal and running around totally 100% normal, but she has been losing weight and is now at the point where it is clear something is wrong. If you can feel the breast bone when you hold her and it is very prominent with little to no meat around it (feels kinda sharp) and the legs feel boney and not at all like a chicken leg you would eat, something is wrong.
    Right before death my one girl had watery pale green poop. However, I didn't even see that until I had brought her in the house due to her laying on her side clearly dying in the yard.
    Somewhat of a silver lining about LL is that there is nothing you can do to cause or cure it. Usually you get it without realizing it from buying or hatching from carriers. Once you have it there is no cure. So it's certainly not your fault, even though it is a sad situation. At least those who are weak to it and die won't breed on more babies who will be weak to it and die. :/
     
  5. katelk

    katelk Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 6, 2013
    White Bluff, TN
    Anyone have any info about my questions? Thanks!
     
  6. Runamuckranch1

    Runamuckranch1 Out Of The Brooder

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    Dec 15, 2014
    Yes, I treated with antibiotics, just finished yesterday , but have had 2 more die this past week.
     
  7. Runamuckranch1

    Runamuckranch1 Out Of The Brooder

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    Dec 15, 2014
    I forgot to add that they have a bad odor when sick, they are listless and just want to sit before they die.
     

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