1. hobbyfarmer221

    hobbyfarmer221 Out Of The Brooder

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    Jul 23, 2013
    Hi, I am a proud owner of 2 parakeets but kind of wasnt something bigger. I want a med-large parrot but only want to spend around $600 tops. Any suggestions would be appreciated, thanks :)
     
  2. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe True BYC Addict

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    I would recommend a shorter lived bird. Macaws live too long and when you die, they'll still be around and wonder where their friend went.
    I worked with Scarlet and Great Greens in Costa Rica where we bred hundreds of them for release in the wild and the majority were rescued from hotels and zoos or after having outlived multiple owners resulting in psychological issues.

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  3. chicken_boy_Kurt

    chicken_boy_Kurt Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 20, 2008
    I agree with ChickenCanoe.

    You have budgies, I'm assuming. (Unless you mean actual parakeets, in which case, that's awesome!) I would suggest working your way up to a Macaw, if you ever do get one. Try a Conure or other similar-sized species. Macaws are a life-time commitment and if you don't put in the time they can develop behavioral problems. It's also very hard to find one for that price, from my experience. Maybe they're cheaper in your area.

    Anyway, I'm suggesting you try a Conure, Quaker, etc. They're smaller, cheaper, quieter (by a very large factor), and are just as loving, affectionate, and fun as a Macaw. :)
     
  4. Rosa moschata

    Rosa moschata Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 20, 2013
    When you say "I want a med-large parrot but only want to spend around $600 tops" is that just for the bird? I say this because a cage for a "med-large parrot" will cost about that much as well, not including toys, food, yearly vet visits, etc.

    I'm not one for the "work your way up to large parrots" philosophy. What happens to the pet birds along the way? Are they just given up as you "work your way up" to the one you wanted in the first place? If a particular species interests you, get yourself ready to own that particular species -- research (and not just from internet forums, though they do offer first-hand experiences), figure out how the bird will fit in your life, where the cage will fit in your home (and then save up for and buy the cage first!), find a good avian vet, etc. If along the way you realize the species you wanted at first won't be a good fit, keep looking for one that will. It's not fair to a cockatiel to be "practice" for a couple years, then passed on while you "work your way up to" a conure or Poicephalus, which would then be given up when you "work your way up" to an Amazon or grey. Unless, of course, you intend to build up a flock...

    :)
     
  5. armywife31

    armywife31 Out Of The Brooder

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    Jul 7, 2013
    There are ways to do this. I adopted my cockatoo from a rescue. He's 20 years old. Anyway his adoption fee was $250 and they sold me his cage for $65. The cage would normally have cost me $700 or so. So my point is, check a rescue. They may have the perfect bird for you.
     
  6. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe True BYC Addict

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    They might also know someone wanting to sell a cage.
     
  7. Nambroth

    Nambroth Fud Lady

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    My Coop
    Some may disagree, but I think it is foolish to willingly dive into parrot ownership with a hard limit of "I only want to spend this much". Even if you get the bird for "free" and get a cheap or free cage... feed, vet costs, toys, and other hidden parrot ownership costs can easily go beyond this amount.

    Most avian vets cost between $40-100 just to walk in the door. A new parrot should ideally have a wellness exam yearly, and the first exam should include a blood panel and fecal swab. You are looking at probably a few hundred dollars right there.
    What happens if the bird gets sick? This can be wildly expensive, and for an intelligent and long-lived parrot you owe it to him or her to try to aid them with medical care.

    If you need to buy a cage, consider the amount of time you will have the parrot out. If it's less than most of the day, you need to get the largest cage you can afford. This can be $500 for a medium cage, and over $800-1,000 for a large cage. Macaws need LARGE cages unless you are able or willing to completely commit a room of your house to the parrot to be out in during waking hours. Aviaries are an option, but only in some climates, and carry the risk of predation if they are not well constructed.

    Macws and other parrots chew-- a lot! Now, there are ways to save money here by constructing your own toys, but it's very important to use toy parts that are non-toxic to the bird. This can be tricky. Even if you build your own though, you can expect to need to replenish toys fairly often. For individual birds, it can be from one to 10 or more toys per month. Parrots love to chew and forage. They are intelligent and need things to occupy them.

    Just some considerations. Whenever someone would approach me with "I have x dollars, what kind of parrot can I get with that?" I would always tell them to go home, put the money in savings and keep adding a lot more, and research in the meantime.
     
  8. armywife31

    armywife31 Out Of The Brooder

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    Jul 7, 2013
    You could go with a conure or something along that size. The post above mine is exactly right but I do want to add something. Macaw are very large with very large beaks. Jumping from parakeets to a macaw is a huge leap. I would not get one unless you have large bird experience and are 100% confident with the bird. The cage size required for a military macaw is 40" wide by 36" deep. You would be lucky to find one under $700. 4 perches plus toys. The toys range from $20 to $50. Unless you make your own. I'm not trying to discourage you but macaws are not a bird to take lightly. I met one Saturday that I was told just walk up, say hi and pet. She tried to bite my face but got my hand. I now have an open wound to watch for infection and bruising.
     

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