Maggots/worms in pin feathers

Discussion in 'Predators and Pests' started by kittycat1356, Jul 14, 2017.

  1. kittycat1356

    kittycat1356 Songster

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    hello, last night I butchered my mean rooster, he managed to slit my wrist while I was helping a chick so he had to go. (The last straw for me, he's been a menace for a few months now, attacking me every time I turned my back)
    It was the first time I ever butchered a chicken, and when I dipped him in the scalding water for about 30 seconds These little things that looked like maggots popped out of his feather holes? They weren't moving or anything, just looked like maggots

    He's been getting in fights constantly, and his feathers were getting scraggly, but nothing looked or smelled infected. He looked otherwise clean and healthy. Any ideas on what it was ?

    I didn't take pics because it was my first time butchering and I wanted to be respectful as I could, and I was upset because I liked him otherwise.

    I'm going to put mineral oil on my one hen he picked on the most, because her back is bare, and she might have those bugs / whatever too. And oil might suffocate them if they are in there.

    Thanks!
     
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  2. ladyearth

    ladyearth Songster

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  3. ladyearth

    ladyearth Songster

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    dang thats terrible.
    BUt I guess mine semi free range and are my babies. my one roo is a sweetheart. course they have been handled a lot... but not as much as three of what I call "my luv to be luved "girls
    If I see Roo jumping their bones I go up and distract him or knock him off gently and tell him to"hump a pole" LOL
    no matter what ,I believe they are all just wanna be luved all creatures domestic that is....
    one member on here said he could handle any by just walking around with the roo like a football till they subdued etc..... ...
    just my two cents worth. we all got to do what s in our safety and heart
    take care and good luck...oh I think I read on this forum that what you saw is normal
    good luck
     
    kittycat1356 likes this.
  4. kittycat1356

    kittycat1356 Songster

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    He used to be tame but shy, and I would carry him around when he attacked me, but he started biting hands and flesh when I'd pick him up.

    my chickens are semi free range, I close them in at night, and open the cage around 1 pm. My younger chickens are let out at 6pm because they run to the neighbors yard, so the less time out keeps them closer to home. They all get along, but that rooster I culled started attacking week old chicks, and the last straw was him attacking my wrist.

    I'm a vegetarian, don't get me wrong, I love my chickens and roosters a lot, I have two chick killing hens still alive living in their own kennel, because I don't have the heart to cull them or even rehome them. ( I may end up just using them for breeding in their own set up, they are both very pretty)
     
  5. Folly's place

    Folly's place Crossing the Road

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    Sorry about your rooster, but he's where he belongs! Attacking humans is not acceptable, and will breed on. I'd like to add that breeding hens who kill their chicks is also not a good plan; breed birds with acceptable/ normal behaviors, not idiots or chick killers. Mary
     
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  6. kittycat1356

    kittycat1356 Songster

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    He has some chicks and young roosters alive still, they act better than he did at their age, they are better mannered.

    The hens don't kill their chicks, but they never hatched any eggs either. They sit on eggs and attack other chicks when they see them. They are otherwise sweet chickens, and get along with chicks who feathered out, just not the downy fuzzballs
     
  7. Folly's place

    Folly's place Crossing the Road

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    My first rooster was a horrible attack bantam, who we tolerated too long, don't ask my why. His offspring were fine, fortunately, and we learned! Bad boys don't stay, ever. I isolate my broody hens, so they have privacy, and can't take out someone else's babies. It happened here too, once, and again, I learned. Chickens are smart, to a point, but then they do what they're going to do, and it's not always very nice. Mary
     
  8. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler!

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    The feather follicle is a slimy snotty kind of thing......might that be what you saw?
    Was it before or after you plucked the feathers out?
    Too bad you couldn't take a pic with a coin next to it for scale.
     
  9. kittycat1356

    kittycat1356 Songster

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    It was the same texture of a maggot, maybe a little softer, definitely slimy, very small, like the size of a white rice. They were only on the lower neck area. It was during the plucking stage when I noticed them, I was removing the feathers and saw those things pop out of his pores/ spots where feathers were about to grow back in. I didn't see any moving, but I did just dunk him in very hot water. ( too hot to put my hand in)
     
  10. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler!

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    Those could be pin feathers too, but probably just what I call 'follicle slime'.
    Kinda freaked/grossed me out the first time I butchered.
    With dark feathered birds it really looks nasty.
    During final cleaning of carcass I used the back of a butter knife to scrape them out and off under running water.
     

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