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  1. Grace Boyer

    Grace Boyer Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 5, 2007
    This isn't an emergency, but I didn't know where else to put it.
    Is it safe for chickens to eat maggots? I know other bugs are healthy, but Iwouldn't think maggots would be. Mine love to ea them when they can find them, though, so if they're okay I don't want to get rid of them. Does anyone know anything abou it?
     
  2. MayberrySaint

    MayberrySaint Chillin' Out

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    Mar 7, 2007
    Mount Airy, NC
    While maggots seem gross...they are no different than any other insect larvae. They are full of protein and hens would think they are gourmet dining.
     
  3. Grace Boyer

    Grace Boyer Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 5, 2007
    Niftola! My scraps trough has hundreds of them in it.

    Next question. Are table scraps okay for them as long as they'll eat them, or is there a point that they'll still eat over-spoiled scaps that will make them sick? I've never had any trouble with that before, but I've always had more chickens to eat them faster than the three I have now.

    Also, I have a rooster in with only two hens (and a guinea that the rooster thinks is a chicken). Will he be too much for just two hens? He is very energetic and thinks the girls are so hot (to put is gently) plus he is two years old to their four (?) and eight years old. Is he going to wear them out or will they be alright?
     
    Last edited: Jun 28, 2007
  4. MayberrySaint

    MayberrySaint Chillin' Out

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    Mar 7, 2007
    Mount Airy, NC
    I think you should probably clean out that scraps trough...if there are maggots in there, the scraps are definitely spoiled and have been in there long enough for flys to lay eggs and have them hatch.
    I would cut back on the scraps and only give them what they will eat in a few hours...especially with the Summer heat.

    The rooster question I will leave to others...lol.
     
  5. panner123

    panner123 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jan 15, 2007
    Garden Valley, ca
    I think you might want to get a couple hens about thesane age as the roos. He can handle about 15 hens, so you can see he may be wearing yours out. They are of the age that he is doing them any good either, they are a little on the old side to be raising chicks.
     
  6. Grace Boyer

    Grace Boyer Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 5, 2007
    I'm planning on cleaning out the trough as soon as I get a chance.May be a couple days, but they haven't been using it much lately anyway.
    '' A little on the old side'' or maybe a lot on the old side. Actually, I don't think I can get any more chickens at this point anyway, because chicknmania and I think mine may have Avian TB. So I guess I'll have to wait and see.
    Thanks for the help!
    Grace
     
    Last edited: Jun 28, 2007
  7. panner123

    panner123 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jan 15, 2007
    Garden Valley, ca
    simple test to see is they have the flu.
     
  8. dlhunicorn

    dlhunicorn Human Encyclopedia

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    Jan 11, 2007
    http://www.entomology.cornell.edu/Extension/Vet/PDF_Files/Poultry_Recom2000.pdf

    http://nabc.ksu.edu/content/factsheets/category/Botulism
    "In
    animals, botulism is classified into two forms: foodborne and toxicoinfectious. The foodborne form occurs when animals ingest preformed toxins in food or C. botulinum spores germinate in anaerobic tissues and produce toxins as they grow. The main sources include decaying vegetable matter, such as grass, hay, grain, spoiled silage, etc. and contaminated meat. Birds can ingest the toxins in maggots that have fed on contaminated carcasses or in dead invertebrates from water with decaying vegetation. The toxicoinfectious form, which corresponds to the wound form in humans, occurs when the bacteria grow in necrotic areas in the liver and GI tract, abcesses in the navel and lungs, or anaerobic wounds in the skin and muscle and appears to be responsible for shaker foal syndrome in horses. In humans, botulism is classified into three forms: foodborne, wound, and infant botulism. Foodborne botulism is the most common form and occurs when humans ingest toxins in various foods. Foods associated with botulism are characteristically associated with inadequately processed, home-canned foods or inappropriate handling and cooking of meat products, canned vegetables, and seafood products."

    http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/PS044
    Botulism
    Synonyms: limberneck, bulbar paralysis, western duck sickness, alkali disease
    Species affected: All fowl of any age, humans, and other animals are highly susceptible. The turkey vulture is the only animal host known to be resistant to the disease.
    Clinical signs: Botulism is a poisoning causing by eating spoiled food containing a neurotoxin produced by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum . Paralysis, the most common clinical sign, occurs within a few hours after poisoned food is eaten. Pheasants with botulism remain alert, but paralyzed. Legs and wings become paralyzed, then the neck becomes limp. Neck feathers become loose in the follicle and can be pulled easily (see Table 3 ).

    If the amount eaten is lethal, prostration and death follow in 12 to 24 hours. Death is a result of paralysis of respiratory muscles. Fowl affected by sublethal doses become dull and sleepy.

    Transmission: Botulism is common in wild ducks and is a frequent killer of waterfowl because the organisms multiply in dead fish and decaying vegetation along shorelines.

    Decaying bird carcasses on poultry ranges, wet litter or other organic matter, and fly maggots from decaying substances may harbor botulism. There is no spread from bird to bird.

    Treatment: Remove spoiled feed or decaying matter. Flush the flock with Epsom salts (1 lb/1000 hens) in water or in wet mash. It has been reported that potassium permanganate (1:3000) in the drinking water is helpful. Affected birds can be treated with botulism antitoxin injections.

    Prevention: Incinerate or bury dead birds promptly. Do not feed spoiled canned vegetables. Control flies. Replace suspected feed.
     
    Last edited: Jun 29, 2007
  9. Grace Boyer

    Grace Boyer Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 5, 2007
    panner123
    What is said simple test? What does it entail and how do you do it?
     

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