Maine Coon Cats? Cat advise as well please :)

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by the Precious Ladies, Oct 12, 2011.

  1. the Precious Ladies

    the Precious Ladies Chillin' With My Peeps

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    My friend, Rhianoen, has a few maine coon cats which just had a litter of kittens *Awwww* and is looking for good homes where they can go when they are old enough. I love how they look like mini tigers and their attitude is so friendly and adorable [​IMG] BUT.. I already have 14 animals ( 9 chickens, a rabbit, two parakeets, and three DOGS) The problem isn't the amount of animals per say, but rather the fact that we have dogs. Our dogs don't bother the chickens that much, and they don't mind the other animals either. Dasiy is a golden retriever and Lilo and Stitch are mutts we rescued from the pound 7 years ago. Im going away to college in * sigh-from-having-to-leave-home* two years, but I'm buying a town house close to the college Im going to so I can bring Lilo with me and other reasons. Anyways (wow- i rambled so much right then) have any of y'all had maine coon cats before? Do you think he or she ( I would adopt one cat) would get along with the dogs? If so- what brand of litter would you recomend and types of toys, and other cat items I should take into consideration.

    Thanks

    Edit* Thanks you guys for all the comments and advice! I have another question too though, how do these cats (or cats in general) react to chickens? I have a friend who also owns chickens and one day her cat got out ( hes an indoor cat) and he killed 10 of her chickens. If they grow up with the chickens since their little- are thay fine with them? pros and cons of Indoor or outdoor cats as well please [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Oct 30, 2011
  2. watchdogps

    watchdogps Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 4, 2011
    Central Ohio
    Are these REGISTERED mainecoons, or longhaired tiger srtiped cats? People call any cat that is longhaired and tiger a mainecoon, but they are not. Maincoons are HUGE cats and have big bone stucture and a certain coat. They can actually be any color except siamese pointed.
     
  3. LittleChickenLady

    LittleChickenLady Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 4, 2011
    Clanton, Alabama
    Our Maine Coon (yes, a real one) absolutely HATES dogs.
    We don't really know why either.. one time he attacked my mom while she was trying to get him off of a shelf because there was a dog just in the room.
    He was breaking things, and she just tried to move him, but she ended up in the ER. [​IMG]

    Also, the really fine clumping kind is what we use and works great.
    Pretty sure it's the kind with the odor blocking stuff.. sorry, I can't remember what it's called. [​IMG]
     
    1 person likes this.
  4. AinaWGSD

    AinaWGSD Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sullivan, IL
    Unless your friend has done tons of health testing on her cats, I would probably pass. They are certainly characters, and I don't think that the dogs would be a problem since they get along with all your other critters and coons can usually hold their own pretty well. My husband's grandma had a Maine Coon that terrorized the neighbor's dobermans (and his older brother). They used to call her to bring her cat in because their dogs wouldn't go outside with the cat sitting on the fence! But they are quickly becoming one of the worst breeds for health problems (persians are probably the only breed with more health problems). Heart disease is rampant in the breed, to the point that many pet health insurance companies will not cover heart disease related expenses if your cat is listed as a Maine Coon or Main Coon mix, and they can also be prone to hip dysplasia and several other health problems. If you are seriously considering a Maine Coon, you had better either do tons of research and be willing to pay more for a kitten from a great breeder or else have a vet fund set up and be willing to spend thousands on vet bills over the cat's life. I work for a vet and we have one client who has 3 Maine Coons, all from breeders (although I personally doubt that they are from truly good breeders). Her female is small, but very healthy except for a round with ringworm when she brought the other two home. One of her males is pretty healthy, just a few rounds of ringworm (which he came home with). The other however has cost her more than a small fortune in the short 3 years she's had him. He averages 2 visits a MONTH! He has severe allergies (he's on allergen injections), which has led to many many skin infections, and also has Irritable Bowel Disease (IBD). Just last month, she had a cancer scare which thankfully turned out to be just his IBD flaring up. He's a sweet cat (good thing too at 20lbs of lean muscle!) but he's been nothing but one health problem after another. They are a beautiful breed, but it's a crying shame what irresponsible breeding due to their popularity has done to them.

    As for cat-related things...everyone has their preferences. Personally my favorite litter of all time is a wheat-based litter called Swheat Scoop. It's a clumping litter, I think it does a fantastic job controlling litter box odors, and best yet it's certified flushable so I don't have to take up space in my trash can (or a landfill) with dirty cat litter. Cat toys really don't have to be anything fancy or expensive (or even necessarily purchased). Plastic rings from milk cartons, pom-pom balls, pipe cleaners or sandwich ties twisted together, crumpled up paper or foil. You can buy or grow your own catnip and make simple little catnip toys with basic sewing skills or by putting some in a baby sock and tying it off. Feathers, of which there are plenty when your chickens are molting, are excellent. They will play with them loose or you can tie them together and put them on a string or stick for an interactive toy. You will need a scratching area for them. It could be as simple as a 2x4 covered in carpet or sisal rope or a huge cat tower (both of which could be purchased or, if you are handy with tools, built from scrap lumber and carpet remnants etc).
     
  5. watchdogps

    watchdogps Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Central Ohio
    Wow, I didn't realize they were so unhealthy. Now that you mention it though, the two I used to have as petsitting clients were messes. One had chronic respiratory and the other had IBD.
    Personally I love norwegian forest cats or siberians for big hairy cats.
     
  6. lishah2000

    lishah2000 Chillin' With My Peeps

    I have a Maine Coon mix and she is wonderful. No doubt she is a mix though. She loves dogs, but hates other cats. I have another cat, but usually keep them separated. (it was pretty clear she didn't like other cats before I got the second, so I knew what I was in for).

    She is 12 now (got her at age 4) and she really hasn't had many health issues. A UTI once and some asthma troubles the last few years, but that seems to be just twice a year and a shot clears it right up.

    I would get another, but I have heard stories of some being aggressive. I would probably go with an adult rescue unless kittens came from healthy parents that I could meet.
     
  7. spiritdance

    spiritdance Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Dec 13, 2010
    I have a Maine Coon (yes, a "real" one), and he's the most "anti-dog" cat I have. He is also obsessively bonded to me. Fortunately, Vladimir is not aggressive about this with people, but heaven help the cat or dog that gets too close to me! I've had MCCs all my life, so I would have to say his attachment is pretty typical of them. As a breed they're quirky, and as another poster noted, recently health issues have become commonplace (I'm fortunate that Vlad comes from an older line that has not been plagued by this). I love the breed, but would advise anyone without breed experience who is considering one to do a lot of research and talk to a lot of owners before making a decision. They are NOT "garfield" type cats, and demand what they consider their "due homage" from their two legged companions.
     
    1 person likes this.
  8. Kaitie09

    Kaitie09 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    South Central, PA
    I've got a Maine Coon mix too and she hate the dogs and other cats. She will tolerate them in the same room, but will growl and swat when they get near. However, she was here before we got the other cats and dogs. She also is testy with people. She will let you know when she wants attention and you better not touch her otherwise. My aunt has her brother and sister and they are the same way. Gizmo (sister) has a stress disorder and licks her belly raw if something changes in the house.

    However, the kitten might get along with them if he/she grows up with them.
     
    Last edited: Oct 13, 2011
  9. greeneggsandham

    greeneggsandham Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Putnam,CT
    My Maine coon had to be put to sleep this past Winter. Goober was 14 years old and 23 lbs. He was a big cat. Hated dogs with a passion even puppies that he was raised with. Hated other cats and he told me when he wanted to petted and when he wanted to be left alone.
    The tufts on his ears were so big and long that they curled right around his ears. I miss my goober boy. [​IMG] He was such a great cat.
     
  10. carolinagirl58

    carolinagirl58 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 30, 2011
    Lugoff, SC
    I had no idea that Maine Coon Cats were so prone to health and behaviour problems. I always thought if I got a cat, it would be one of these. Now....maybe not. They sure are pretty though.
     

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