Male hates being handled...

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by chickenrookie16, Jul 13, 2010.

  1. chickenrookie16

    chickenrookie16 Out Of The Brooder

    31
    0
    32
    Jun 25, 2010
    i had this male, that when ever i go in his stall and tries to get him he flies every where
    when you first hold him he screams and tries to get away, after he gets use to you, he will usually calm down
    is there any way i could get him to trust me more...i had him for 2 months now.
     
  2. gritsar

    gritsar Cows, Chooks & Impys - OH MY!

    28,907
    119
    408
    Nov 9, 2007
    SW Arkansas
    He's reacting to you as he would another, more dominant rooster. The subordinate rooster(s) avoid the alpha roo at all costs and when all else fails and they are caught, they go limp and hope the alpha roo gets bored.
    Personally I like a roo that's a tad bit respectful (read:afraid) of me. It means he'll generally keep his distance and not challenge me for the lead position of the flock.
    I have plenty of hens to love on and make friends with. My rooster is for protection, procreation and providing for the hens.
     
  3. chickenrookie16

    chickenrookie16 Out Of The Brooder

    31
    0
    32
    Jun 25, 2010
    so thats good?...wow, but my friends they chickens, you can just walk up to them and hold them.
     
  4. sourland

    sourland Broody Magician Premium Member

    65,198
    13,287
    786
    May 3, 2009
    New Jersey
    If he's just a flock or barnyard rooster, such behavior is OK. Overly socialized roosters frequently become human aggressive. If he is a 4 H or show chicken, it's not good. Animals have a fight or flight reaction to aid them in survival. Sometimes if you put such a rooster in a very small pen, he will realize that he can't get away. A couple of days in the pen, A couple of days reaching in and gently touching, Gently reach in pick him up and release, hold for longer periods of time. Sometimes this works. It will vary depending on the age, breed, and life experiences of the rooster.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by