Male to female ratio and female noise level

Discussion in 'Ducks' started by duckncover, Oct 24, 2013.

  1. duckncover

    duckncover Duck Obsessed

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    I have a 2 week old mallard drake. In the summer, I'd like to try to get him a female to have as a companion. Can I give him just one? I don't have room for more than 2 ducks where I live. Also since he is a mallard would any breed of duck be okay as a mate? I was thinking about an Indian Runner duck. It says online they weigh 3 1/2 pounds. He should weigh 2 1/2 pounds as an adult. Would they be compatible?
     
  2. Our mallard was a very good gentleman and wasn't a rowdy rapist. So I'd say an Indian runner would be fine. But every duck is different and he may be too rambunctious for just one hen,
    IME, Indian runners nor mallards are very loud.
     
  3. hfchristy

    hfchristy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have read that a solitary drake needs fewer ducks than you would need for each drake in a larger flock because part of the sex drive is actually "claiming" the females, and if there's no competition, then they don't need to do that.
    We had two male & two female last summer, and that was NOT okay, even after one of the boys learned that he wasn't allowed to touch either of the females, but I think with different females, it would have been fine. Our bigger, dominant, drake is mallard-sized, and one of the girls is a pekin AND not interested in him. She was plucked mercilessly, and stopped laying from the stress. He successfully mates the second Pekin we got to improve the gender balance, but only because she stays still and holds her own head down for him. The other one stands up and shakes him off - so he just keeps trying. and trying. and trying.
    All that said, if we only had the second Pekin and the drake, I think they'd be fine. Since adding her, he really doesn't pay much attention to the other girls unless the other drake tries to get a turn with them. Just don't try to match him with a heavyweight duck.

    Christy
     
  4. HollyDuckFarmer

    HollyDuckFarmer Chillin' With My Peeps

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    My Runner duck is super loud! Have you considered a KC or even a mix?
     
  5. hfchristy

    hfchristy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Do you have a source for adult ducks? Last year's young ducks were absurdly loud, and the smaller the duck, the larger the quack. Once they started laying, things reached a tolerable volume. This year's new ducks are just as loud. Really hoping that they calm down when they get a little older.
     
  6. duckncover

    duckncover Duck Obsessed

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    Right now I have 2 mallard drakes that are 2 1/2 weeks old. I ordered them from Ideal. My friend is raising one of them and I am raising the other. They are both pretty friendly. I'm hoping as long as there is no females around they will get along with each other. I am raising them as "house ducks". There really is no need for any females since they are louder and I wouldn't want babies or eggs anyways. So I guess this question was just out of curiosity. I'm hoping my Webster will be a good pet. I know males can be hormonal around their season but I think I can deal with it as long as it isn't permanent. Puddles is with my friend and it's up to raise him right. If she doesn't handle him enough I'll probably just give him to a farm where he can be a outdoor pet. I know of 3 people that have 2 males as house pets and they get along fine and are good pets. Wish me luck guys!
     
  7. Going Quackers

    Going Quackers Overrun With Chickens

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    You can certainly try a bachelor flock, many do. females can and do complicate things lol plus the noise level definitely goes up A LOT> I have 3 call females.. with one drake... the noise they create is more than anyone on the entire farm.

    Good luck!
     

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