Mama and her new chicks...ADVICE PLEASE.

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by newchicksmama, Aug 13, 2013.

  1. newchicksmama

    newchicksmama Out Of The Brooder

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    So we have a mama who went broody and I couldn't get her to quit laying on the un-fertilized eggs.
    Got some fertilized ones from a friend, and three days ago they hatched, had a weak one but after some tender love and care it's perking up and on its way back to being where it's sibling chick is. (Only two hatched)
    QUESTION:
    I "candled" the remaining eggs (2) and saw right through one, and the other was solid black, tossed the un-fertilized one and replaced the fertilized thinking it needed another day or so to hatch.
    Three days after its siblings had hatched, it has not.
    Mama is still sitting on it, but I'm noticing her actually sitting off of it for a bit and only goes back to the egg when the chicks are sitting with the egg.
    HOW LONG UNTIL I JUST TAKE AWAY THIS LAST EGG?
    AND.....
    The way our coop is, I can shut the top part of the coop and they can't go down the ramp to the grass, I have had it shut since the first chick was born so they couldn't fall down the ramp (one already had)
    So mama and the two chicks are in the top part of the coop separate from the other four ladies. (The four ladies are free range and not allowed in the coop)
    The one very healthy chick I thought should prob start walking in the grass and pecking at the ground, so today I lifted both chicks to the ground inside the coop and let mama down.
    She almost trampled one because she was so mad that our dog was on the other side watching. (Both dogs are scared of our chickens) so I quickly scooped both back up and let mama go upstairs and shut them back in.
    What is the best way to slowly introduce mama and chicks to the grass again and should I just keep them like this until the chicks are bigger?!
    Not sure how to proceed best for chicks and mama.
    Thanks for your advice and thanks for reading my "book" of a question!
     
  2. SportChick

    SportChick Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I don't have an answer but am eagerly awaiting the responses from people who do . . .
     
  3. IrishAcreFarm

    IrishAcreFarm Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I actually had a chick hatch this year from an egg that was 5 days later than the rest. Total shock as I thought it was a dud, however I hadnt candled th eggs, I just let mama do her thing. :) In my opinion, I would wait a week. The younger chick did just fine with the older babies :)
    As for your other question, I kept them all in a smaller area for at least a week or two while they got bigger, but it really depends on your setup :) hope all goes well.
     
  4. MrsBachbach

    MrsBachbach Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mama knows best. She will take the chicks out when she's ready. Of course that ramp may cause the chicks to leave earlier than they should. So, I would give them maybe about 5 more days to get stronger and give the other egg time to hatch, then just open the hatch and let mom take over. She is going to be ready to leave that hutch. You are going to notice, like you did with the dogs, that she is going to fly at anything she thinks is a threat to her chicks. She may even do this with you or the other hens. Quite normal. I've had hens go both ways. Very aggressive toward me or very trusting of me. Just depends on the hen.
     
  5. newchicksmama

    newchicksmama Out Of The Brooder

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    Thank you both for your advice! I will leave the other egg for a few more days, and see what happens. The weak chick is doing well and perking up but I can tell still lacks so much energy. But it's starting to peck and mess with the food, and I give it save-a-chick water from tractor supply with a ml syringe and it seems to be doing better than it was...

    ALSO, I ment to ask. When I finally allow all of my ladies to co-mingle again, should I watch out for the other ladies? Will they attack the younger ones? Again, I won't let them out to mingle until I KNOW they are well big enough and would be able to run if needed... Just don't know how other ladies act towards babies.
     
  6. Lady of McCamley

    Lady of McCamley Overrun With Chickens

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    I agree that momma will know what is best for the chicks and will protect them from the other hens and animals.However, I don't like to make her work harder than she has to. Keep aggressive animals away. I have a brooding hutch with its own little run that the other hens can see through but can't get to any of the little ones. I personally prefer to intermingle at 8 weeks after the chicks have gotten hardier and bigger. It is also safer for the chicks from the standpoint of disease. It allows their immune systems to get stronger before encountering the commonly carried viruses of adult hens.

    I also prefer to keep my chicks in the brooder hutch with mom until they get a little older, 5 to 7 days, simply because they are so small that it takes them about a week to figure out how to navigate the ramp back up and they can slip through the cracks in the fence and get outside my yard. (Believe me when I say they can always seem to find the tiny hole to crawl out through but can NEVER seem to find it to crawl back in!) A lone chick peeping madly outside protective care is a sure draw to predators and it can expire quickly without food, water, or warmth. With each hatch I get down on my hands and knees and figure out places they can get themselves into trouble and remove or block off. (I've lost chicks with "stupid chick tricks" of getting themselves stuck and expiring.)

    Overall though, I let momma take care of them and guide them in and out of the brooder hutch into their run and back again. It is cute to see momma cluck to tell them to eat, cluck to tell them to drink, and then cluck to tell them it is time to curl up and take a nap under her feathers.

    Have fun with them.
    Lady of McCamley
     
  7. MrsBachbach

    MrsBachbach Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I agree. Keep them away from the others for awhile. I had a broody that tried to protect her chicks but she got beat up herself and put on the run with her going one way and the chicks going the other, so it's best to have a separate raising area for the chicks. I've noticed my broodies are ready to leave the chicks at about 6 to 7 wks, so watch for behavior from mom that tells you she is ready to leave them. Mom will usually start pecking at chicks or chasing them. That tells you she wants out.
     
  8. newchicksmama

    newchicksmama Out Of The Brooder

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    These tips are awesome! Thank you to everyone responding and letting me know your tips and experience. Love reading them and will most def. put them into practice. Thank you!!
     
  9. BettyJo

    BettyJo Out Of The Brooder

    I need help! 15 hens, 2 roosters, including a broody Frizzle who hatched a chick on 10/14. We created a fenced in area in the coop for mama/baby to keep safe. I've let mama out with her chick a couple times, but only to wander in the coop for 5 min. Today, I let her and chick out to mingle with rest of flock. Other hens pecked at her face, and chick. Mama cowered and didn't try to protect the chick. Guess I should keep her secluded for longer? If she doesn't have the protective hormones flowing at 10 days, will she ever? I'm sure this is a scenario someone on this site can relate to. Any suggestions?
     
  10. newchicksmama

    newchicksmama Out Of The Brooder

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    I just recently had one of my ladies hatch two chicks....they are now a little older and about teenager age, but this site and other ladies helped me a lot! Mama and baby need to be kept apart and have their own area for as long as you can, till the chick can run or defend itself. A little bit of a hassle, but it passes.
    Good luck, and just make sure mama and baby have space for just them.
     

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