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mama goat rejected babies

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by lukin4trbl, Jan 13, 2017.

  1. lukin4trbl

    lukin4trbl New Egg

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    Apr 1, 2016
    Roy, WA
    We have a young mama goat who rejected her babies 3 days ago we have tried putting them back in there. She kicks them in the head and walks away. I tried leaving them in there and let them cry for her she looks at them and walks away. I have been bottle feeding them and they are thriving but mama goat just keeps screaming outside. You go outside or take babies out she stops they are super small and its so cold I cant leave them out there I dont know what to do any suggestions would be helpful?
     
  2. oldhenlikesdogs

    oldhenlikesdogs Sits With Chickens Premium Member

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    It's best that you raise the babies. I've had does who don't know that they are their kids, especially if they wandered away during those first few minutes while she's delivering another one, or if she's a new mom. She will dry up and go back to be a goat after a bit.
     
  3. lukin4trbl

    lukin4trbl New Egg

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    Apr 1, 2016
    Roy, WA


    Thank you so much for response the babies are doing good inside. I just was scared we lost a baby last month she had babies early looked like raw chicken and two days later she was in shock and died. My heart broke and I can't lose another
     
  4. oldhenlikesdogs

    oldhenlikesdogs Sits With Chickens Premium Member

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    I have lost plenty of goats and kids over the years, none are ever easy to take. Your mom goat should be fine, most take about 2-4 weeks to dry up and return to normal, and the babies will do fine being raised by you. Next year she may be a better mom or she may not.

    As far as your other goat she could have been unwell and that's why she aborted her kids. There seems to be too many reasons for goats to die. They are more fragile than people believe.
     
  5. FishMtFarm

    FishMtFarm Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I think part of the reason they seem to be so fragile is because of copper and selenium deficiency. Copper deficiency can cause all sorts of problems like parasite overloads, rough fur coat, weight loss, lethargy, hair loss, etc. And selenium deficiency can be really scary. I give selenium to all our newborns and to the pregnant does 30 days before their due date. You make sure they are not deficient and it's amazing how hardy they are and how low maintenance they are.
     
  6. lukin4trbl

    lukin4trbl New Egg

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    Apr 1, 2016
    Roy, WA
    She died and we are devastated
     
  7. FishMtFarm

    FishMtFarm Chillin' With My Peeps

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    The mother goat died? Awe so sorry. What happened?
     
  8. kraChickenKidd

    kraChickenKidd New Egg

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    Oct 5, 2015
    I'm so sorry for your loss
    :,( that's so sad. I really am sorry to hear that. But don't let it ruin you on raising goats. When raising animals, there will be just as much bad as good. Even if we do everything right. It's just the way nature is
     
  9. lukin4trbl

    lukin4trbl New Egg

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    Apr 1, 2016
    Roy, WA
    I am wondering if anyone has suggestions on how to get baby goats to eat stuff besides formula. I know they are young but I want to prepare
     
  10. oldhenlikesdogs

    oldhenlikesdogs Sits With Chickens Premium Member

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    They usually won't touch much stuff until after 4 weeks of age. I always stuff something in their mouths after a feeding which they promptly spit out. Eventually they will start nibbling at stuff, especially if they get a bit hungry, so I increase their milk to only so much before I start to cut it down to encourage eating. Hay is best as it starts to develop the rumen. I also offer a handful of sweet feed or a goat ration. It can take a while before they are eating good enough.
     

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