Mandarin Duck Care?

Discussion in 'Ducks' started by rockin_chick32, Apr 12, 2009.

  1. rockin_chick32

    rockin_chick32 Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 21, 2009
    I'm a little new to ornamental ducks, and I was wondering if Mandarins need a lot of special care (large pond/lake, free-range, large trees etc.)

    I heard they were a breed of wood duck, so I was wondering what the bare essentials for their environment are.

    I have VERY LITTLE money, so if you have any ideas on ways to save money, please feel free to post your ideas, also.

    Thank you for your time!
     
  2. ChickenToes

    ChickenToes Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 14, 2008
    NE Wisconsin
    I imagine taking care of Mandarins is the same as taking care of other ducks.

    They don't need a pond or kiddie pool to bathe in, but they do enjoy it and it keeps their feathers cleaner. Whatever waterer they do have has to be big enough for them to stick their entire head into.

    Free ranging is always a good thing, but if you don't have the room, then just give them a nice big pen to run around in. Inside the pen, each bird needs about 10 square feet of space, minimum. They also need a coop to go into at night to protect them from predators.

    Good luck!
     
  3. cawooduck

    cawooduck Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 21, 2009
    Livermore, CA
    Mandarins are a lot different than other barnyard ducks. It wouldnt be right not to provide them with atleast a small kiddie pool or mason tub to bathe in, if you dont, you will have one pathetic looking duck, after all, wouldnt you want a bright colored, healthy looking pair of ORNAMENTAL waterfowl, if not, get a peking or rouen and save your money. A 10 x 10 fully enclosed pen is what you would need with one pair. They are a perching duck, so they need something off the ground to perch on, a branch, a platform or 2 x 4.

    And dont expect them to come running up to you and eat out of your hand, they are not the tamest ducks on the planet. My mandarins wont come any closer than 5 feet, even feeding them meal worms. The only ducks that will come any closer are my pintails and ring teal, and the wood ducks stay even farther away than the mandarins, even the ones i hatched from eggs and raised them their whole life.
     
  4. rockin_chick32

    rockin_chick32 Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 21, 2009
    Thank you. I have plans for renovating a large pond in my yard, but I need to save up first. The kiddie pool is a good idea.

    Thank you for your time.[​IMG]
     
  5. bemba

    bemba Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mary Valley QLD.
    I have to disagree with the above comment, I have had my mandarins for about 3 weeks now, and when I first got them they were absolutely WILD, hurling themselves into the wire at just the sight of me. I started everyday, just sitting in their pen and egnoring them, throweing the occasional mealworn their way. As the days went on they became more and more trusting, they are now eating right at my feet and just about out of my hands, I think it's 1 part strategy and 2 parts time. PS food was only ever offered when I was present, no food left in the pen for free feeding. They are stunning birds!!!
     
  6. Oregon Blues

    Oregon Blues Overrun With Chickens

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    Central Oregon
    I have doubts about free-range mandarins.

    Everyone I know with Mandarins keeps them in flight cages, all nicely landscaped with the living conditions that teh ducks need. Proper cover, proper nesting areas, a small but easy to clean pool. That makes me suspect that they won't stick around if they have other options.

    I would say that Mandarins are not the best choice for anyone on a severely limited budget.

    There are breeds of domestic duck that are beautiful to look at. They are less expensive to keep. Although without proper shelter and protective fencing, they probably won't live long.

    If you are looking for showy, you can keep a peacock loose in the barnyard. they need a tree or something to roost in, but don't need fancy expensive housing.
     

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