Massive Cotyote Pack - South Bay Area - California

Discussion in 'Predators and Pests' started by HnkyDnkyZZFarm, Sep 24, 2016.

  1. HnkyDnkyZZFarm

    HnkyDnkyZZFarm Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hiya there.

    We have a MASSIVE coyote problem.

    Thus far we have been able to avoid any casualties, but my nights are getting a little too exciting for my liking. Being ready to leap out of bed when the pack gets too close to go a 'yote chasin isn't really my idea of restful sleep. I woke up this morning at 4am from out cold to shoes on and heading out the door in under a minute. I rolled over and said to my hubbends, "We have to get out there - NOW" and we did. Ran the bunch through with flashlights, but this is getting outrageous. I mean okay, I love the farm life, but come on now. This isn't the frontier. We are twenty minutes from tech-topia. I shouldn't be contemplating whether I need a club with fire.

    In our neighborhood, we have two horses, three dogs, six goats, two sheep, twelve chickens, three ducks, two rabbits and three cats.

    This is just our farm team of two families. This doesn't include animals or children or elderly persons cared for by the neighborhoods that butt up to our ranches. A jogger unaware could find themselves in a world of scared and possibly hurt if they decided to go check out the country side of town before about 5am. Kind of makes all the stick toting walkers seem kind of silly. Oh yeah, you have that stick, but the real thing that's saving your butt is daylight.

    As the cold weather wears in and they start running short on game, we all know exactly where they're going to be. They know we're here, for now we're a tough target, but if something doesn't give, I'll be camping out behind the pens come end of Novemberish.

    When I fed horses this morning, there were easily twenty piles of fresh coyote scat in the arena - 50 yards behind the house.

    I have called our local "wildlife control" but I say that term really loosely. "Vector" is handling our wildlife control, but I'm VERY skeptical of their understanding of the problem or their ability - or moreso willingness to do anything about it. As far as I've researched, their primary business is mosquito and tick control. I'll be honest, I don't think they're up to the task. I don't think they have any CLUE how bad this has gotten. I left a message but they wont be back till Monday. So I have two more nights at least of this. IF they come out, rather than telling me that "wildlife is pretty and natural" (sure it is. Till you overpack an area with it because you've built over their previous habitat. Some rich yuppie gets a new house and I get a doubled coyote pack... sounds about accurate.)

    We're in an unincorporated area where we don't have an animal control proper and parks and wildlife are handled more like a Human Relations department than a game or predator control. Domestic animals are arrested by our local PD till their owners come bail them out.

    I'm done trying to handle this with neighborhood organization. We've done the best we can, but due to the building of tract homes a couple miles down the road, we have inherited the coyote population from the fields becoming homes, in addition to our already thriving population.

    Previously we had a fairly neighborly relationship with our yotes, there is enough wild game - in the form of gophers, wild turkeys, and orchard fruit to keep them from coming in too close - too close means about an acre out. That's my comfort zone for a pack of thirty plus.

    Do you think they'll do anything? Does anyone have any experiences with Vector, any advice? Any other ideas? Who else can I call? Should I start petitioning? Chase down my city council? I don't think they'd get it.


    Sadly, yotes aren't a sign of a healthy farming community. If you have as many as we have close in, it means that they are impacted for den space, low on game and that there are only a few farms with livestock in the area and they are working up their nerve to become more aggressive.

    Healthy farming communities drive out yotes, just due to the human activity and the population density driving prey away from the farms, and the animal density acts as protection in numbers. I sadly understand that we're trying to hold on to a way of life that is dying, but the feeling that we probably have no support coming for this challenge (could be just my lack of sleep talking, or maybe because in the past they've been very hesitant to even come out when we have a big guy get too familiar with humans) but I'm kind of boggling on what to do about this. I'm down with a handful or so, but this is ridiculous. It sounds like a high speed police chase, sirens and all in my back field every night.

    Shooting them is out of the question - at least legally speaking. We're on the edge of a town with a no discharge of firearms law. Even though we are unincorporated, if an unincorporated area butts up against a town, the towns laws take priority. You can have a gun, but you can't use it without going to jail. Just perfect.

    Who'm I gonna call? GHOSTBUSTERS!!! No seriously, who should I call besides Vector?
     
  2. Howard E

    Howard E Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Feb 18, 2016
    Missouri
    How big of an area are you trying to protect?

    Depending on terrain, with a little effort, I could probably put up an electric fence that would establish a perimeter that no coyote is going to get through. It would be the same as you have now, a high population of coyotes......except with an electric fence they would be kept at arm's length. In theory to the boundary of your property.

    Consider the alternative, which is what you have now. Other than your desire to have them leave you alone, which is ineffective, what is there to deter them from walking up to your front door and saying "howdy......feed me". An electric fence is that deterrent. It bites back.
     
  3. HnkyDnkyZZFarm

    HnkyDnkyZZFarm Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jan 2, 2016
    Northern California
     
  4. HnkyDnkyZZFarm

    HnkyDnkyZZFarm Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jan 2, 2016
    Northern California
    I was able to get a live body on the local wildlife centers hotline! Huzzah! Their website seems to be the most in depth anyways on the challenge. Hopefully we fall within their jurisdiction. The gal on the phone seemed to be on top of things and hopefully we'll hear back soon!
     
  5. HnkyDnkyZZFarm

    HnkyDnkyZZFarm Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jan 2, 2016
    Northern California
    I went for a drive to the road where the new construction is and the problem has become quite evident. The developer has put in a 10-12ft sound wall all the way down the road, completing the walls of and enclosing the housing developments on the other side of the orchards and fields for the length of what was previously undeveloped space. No wonder we have a problem!!!

    The yotes are quite literally penned in. There is no gap for them to get out that doesn't involve going through at least two blocks of fenced back yard and over that retaining wall, or through the same maze in another development farther down the road and over a similar wall.

    Kind of peeves me. I'm no touchy feely save everything that has a face type, but this is downright negligent. They have to go somewhere.

    Really hoping they do something about this. It's just a matter of time before they become a major problem.
     
  6. Howard E

    Howard E Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Missouri
    As you describe the problem, it may be possible to attract the attention of you state fish and game dept. and get them to help you capture and do something with these coyotes. Or else get them to come in and eliminate or shoot them for you. Or give you special permission to start shooting yourself.

    If not, and they want them left as is / where is.......then a good electric fence is a good solution.
     
  7. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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    My Coop
    That STINKS!!!

    It's a 'temporary' problem with the construction concentrating them...but that doesn't help right now.

    You can't shoot at them but can you set off some kind of bangers/firecrakers to show your place is not a nice place?
    Kind of weak suggestion, but might be a part of your arsenal.....an appetizer to the entree of hot fence.
     
  8. carlf

    carlf Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mobile, AL
    Relocating coyotes is not gonna happen, besides it being next to impossible to get one to go into a cage trap, there is no place that I know of where that is legal nor is there anywhere in the US that is not already overrun with coyotes.

    You need lethal control or exclusion..

    I don't know about California, but in almost all other states, predatory control and protection of your livestock is your responsibility. The state might be able to assist with advice & education, but I seriously doubt they will have the staff or manpower to actively respond to every single complaint about coyotes let alone the time & money to try to trap them. Trapping is seriously manpower intensive and I dont know of any state DNR that does it on private propety. Maybe I am wrong, given the amount of taxes you pay in CA, maybe they do???

    Did you call the local USDA Wildlife Services? https://www.aphis.usda.gov/aphis/ourfocus/wildlifedamage/sa_reports/sa_informational%20notebook/ct_california_info/!ut/p/z1/lVHLbsIwEPyV9sAxWucBCcdAo5KqD6lAaHyxHOOA28SOHAPq39dAT0WEZi-r9c7srmcAwwdgSfdiQ41Qkla2zvGIPL8FU3cyRzYnExQn7-FLkqTeYxDCqguAXB9wP342G1nAYrl4jdxJOvb-x0dXIkZ9918AcPf4DDBgJk1jtpDTZitawpQ0XBpSiUJT_T1ALSVqp0mp2K49VQdRrStRcrKmNd3w05vmjdLm3BeyVLr-9eBOKsMLpb4GiBnCqCUqLcUZddzeMLGGnEduwQIaOKOyjJwgLDyn4JHvMMpYEfkuCziDp5tyTCFfZQ9pGwN2rTi4i3Cy9w_g0r9bCubWgfDqTWN7017wAyzlUZIK5j2_PEPQ1EsbdeQPq3H6OdzUJL7_AVNM2IY!/dz/d5/L2dBISEvZ0FBIS9nQSEh/?urile=wcm%3Apath%3A%2Faphis_content_library%2Fsa_our_focus%2Fsa_wildlife_damage%2Fsa_reports%2FSA_Informational%20Notebook%2Fct_california_info

    Or call a critter control company? Check your yellow pages.

    California further handicapped itself by being one of the few, if not the only, states that prohibit the use of foothold traps and snares
    Thank the bunnie hungers & PETA for that.
    Like I noted above, you will almost never get a coyote to go into a cage trap.
    So about your only real option is calling them and shooting them. But wait, that's also not an option because of you local ordinances!
    Nothing like emptying the tool box and then finding out you need a wrench!

    So, basically unless you get professional help, in your situation, you need to fence your chickens in a 5 sided run. Since its coyotes, you will need welded wire fence at least 5' high.
    Electric fencing is an option (check you local ordinances, I kid you not, some towns prohibit them as "dangerous"). I will let others give advice on that.
     

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