Meat Bird, how long should I raise her?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by mrserv0n, Apr 12, 2012.

  1. mrserv0n

    mrserv0n Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 5, 2012
    My wife accidently bought a meat bird along with a mix of normal chickens, Well this thing is a sweetie, but its only 7 weeks old and I kid you not it weighs as much as 2 bricks or more. I would keep it and take care of it with the rest of my pet chickens but after research I hear by 9-12 weeks it starts to become really painful for the chicken to be alive.

    How long should I let my meat bird live before I take it to a farm to be turned into a meal? I am willing to put in the extra effort and care for it even though it can barely walk, its legs are like tree trunks its discusting. But I don't want it to suffer if its genetically designed to die 7 weeks after birth.


    So whats the right thing to do for this bird?

    Thanks
     
  2. WI FarmChick

    WI FarmChick Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Feb 22, 2012
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    It wasn't designed to live very long. It will either have a heart attack or something.... as it's organs start to shut down.

    i would make a meal out of it soon.
     
  3. mrserv0n

    mrserv0n Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 5, 2012
    Thought so, Ok thanks Ill find a farm in the area to drop it off.
     
  4. glucke

    glucke Out Of The Brooder

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    Dec 14, 2011
    cornish rock chicken? I really hate to say this... but i would send it to freezer-camp. commercially they are processed at about 42 days. yes, it's sad but they are incredibly tasty!
     
    Last edited: Apr 12, 2012
  5. WI FarmChick

    WI FarmChick Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Feb 22, 2012
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    Why don't you keep it and eat it?
     
  6. StephanieH

    StephanieH Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 16, 2012
    If you do "drop it off" make sure it's with the farmer's okay! I didn't realize what issues could arise from animals abandoned on farms until talking to some local farmers.
     

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