Meat rabbits not getting tame

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by DJSquizzy, Jan 5, 2015.

  1. DJSquizzy

    DJSquizzy New Egg

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    Jan 5, 2015
    Hi all,

    I have three California rabbits, all about 8-9 months old, that I've had for around six months. They're in three separate cages, or rather one large cage with three partitions in it, each one about 2 ft x 3 ft x 2 ft. I feed and water them everyday, but for some reason they have not warmed to me AT ALL. They run around their cages and basically freak out every time they see me, regardless of the fact that I am around them every day, and they have not gotten tame at all since I've had them (basically from 9 weeks old or so).

    I'm trying to breed them now by placing the females in the male's cage, and while he's doing his job (well trying to anyways!), they are EXTREMELY difficult to pick up and put in his cage. When I get either one, after running around their cages wildly, they both sort of clam up and don't move. They get extremely nervous and scared and they don't really do anything after I put them in his cage.

    My question is this: does anyone know of any way to make them more receptive to me? Should I try smaller cages? I have a hard time picking them up because the cage is so big, but they REFUSE to be touched, let alone picked up.

    Thanks for your help.
     
    Last edited: Jan 5, 2015
  2. enola

    enola Overrun With Chickens

    You need to handle them every day, not just the day you want to breed them. What method are you using to pick them up?
     
  3. DJSquizzy

    DJSquizzy New Egg

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    Jan 5, 2015

    I put one hand under their front legs and use the other to support their hind legs/rear. I have no problem handling them, but I'm afraid they'll hurt themselves with the amount that they freak out when I go to pick them up. I don't need them to be SUPER tame or anything, but just easier to handle.
     
    Last edited: Jan 5, 2015
  4. enola

    enola Overrun With Chickens

    They will be more comfortable if one hand is firmly gripping the loose skin above their shoulders and the other hand is supporting their rumps. When you handle them you MUST be confident. If you are a nervous wreck and you EXPECT them to act frightened, they are going to realize you are just as frightened as they are. They are going to act out.

    Try just taking them out of the cage and walking around the room until you and the rabbit have relaxed. If you do this every day, you and the rabbits will get used to each other.
     

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