Medicated Feed and Eating the Eggs?

Discussion in 'Feeding & Watering Your Flock' started by JodyJo, Jul 30, 2011.

  1. JodyJo

    JodyJo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have seen several posts from people saying not to feed medicated feed to your hens when they start laying (I have a mixed age flock so this is easier, with Oyster Shell on the side)
    ...but they said they would not recommend eating the eggs from those hens?

    I understand the statement, but is this a true concern? Should I not be giving mine medicated when they are older, **its just more convenient with roosters, 7 week olds and POL.

    Not sure I can find unmedicated Grower where I live, or even Flock Raiser!
     
  2. JodyJo

    JodyJo Chillin' With My Peeps

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  3. mulewagon

    mulewagon Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Where I am, just the starter is medicated - it has something that suppresses a B vitamin, which is supposed to keep cocci from growing.

    So check, your grower may be fine. Also, we ate the eggs when I was feeding everybody starter, and neither we nor the chickens got sick. But we were both eating many other things besides that!
     
  4. JodyJo

    JodyJo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I will have to check my bag...I am allergic to Sulfa, at least medications...so I want to be sure.
     
  5. Chris09

    Chris09 Circle (M) Ranch

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    Most feed Co.'s will use one of two types of medications in there medicated chick starter as a active ingredient.

    First type,
    Amprolium which goes by the trade names Corid and Amprovine, Amprolium, Amprol, Anticoccid and is a thiamine analog, competitively inhibits the active transport of thiamine (B1).
    According to the Amprolium site there is no withdrawal periods in both eggs and poultry meat.

    The second type,
    Lasalocid goes by the trade name Bovatec. Bovatec (lasalocid) is a coccidiocide that kills coccidia. It is an ionophore that moves potassium, sodium, calcium and magnesium into the cell causing the cell to burst. Bovatec works primarily on a single developmental stage of coccidia, providing a more narrow range of action than Deccox.
    There is no withdrawal required because Lasalocid is confined to the alimentary canal of the bird.

    Chris
     
  6. gale65

    gale65 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Quote:I had the same concern and was told by someone here that the amprolium that ours has in it isn't sulfa based.
     
  7. Chris09

    Chris09 Circle (M) Ranch

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    Amprolium (INN, trade names Amprovine, Amprolium, Amprol, Anticoccid) is a coccidiostat used in poultry.
    The drug is a thiamine analogue and blocks the thiamine transporter of Eimeria species. By blocking thiamine uptake it prevents carbohydrate synthesis.
    Despite only moderate efficacy it is well favoured due to few resistance issues and is commonly used in conjunction with sulphonamides prophylactically in chickens and cattle as a coccidiostat.

    Sulfonamide or sulphonamide is the basis of several groups of drugs. The original antibacterial sulfonamides (sometimes called sulfa drugs or sulpha drugs)

    Chris
     
    Last edited: Jul 30, 2011
  8. JodyJo

    JodyJo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    checked my bag of feed, NON medicated...so I feel better about selling and eating these eggs!
    Thanks for all the help!
     

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