Medicated Feed/Coccidiosis Question

Discussion in 'Feeding & Watering Your Flock' started by ashsmith, Jul 3, 2010.

  1. ashsmith

    ashsmith Out Of The Brooder

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    I am a newbie to chicken keeping, and I have a few questions about coccidiosis and would appreciate any feedback y'all can provide.

    My chicks are currently 8 weeks old and have been on Purina Medicated Star & Grow since they hatched. They have never been vaccinated.

    I understand that medicated feed is useless if the chicks aren't exposed to coccidiosis, but how do I know if they've been exposed? They do have access to an outdoor run during the day. The run was grass but is now mostly dead grass and dirt. Chickens have never been in the run until I got my chicks 2 months ago, so I'm not sure if they have been exposed to coccidiosis. I do have lots of birds in my yard (mainly doves and jays).

    Here's my question: Is coccidiosis present is most dirt naturally, or is it only present in dirt that chickens have grazed on? Considering that wild birds have been in my yard, can I assume that coccidiosis is present in my dirt?

    Thanks in advance for any feedback.
     
  2. chicmom

    chicmom Dances with Chickens

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    Cocci is always in dirt. Then when you add chickens, it'll be in the dirt even more. Chicks can still get cocci even if they're taking medicated chick starter. A really good environment for cocci to thrive in is a hot, humid, wet environment, + chicken poo, of course. Cocci is always there, but these weather conditions can really make it run wild.

    I did have some chicks get cocci this spring, just before summer. It was raining ALOT, so the dirt was pretty muddy, and it was also hot and humid. I had just put some 8 week old chicks out in my a-frame coop. I went out one morning to feed/water and saw some blood dots in the poo. So I medicated them immediately, and I didn't lose any. I was very lucky.

    If you run into cocci, you need a coccidiostat, and not an antibiotic. Since cocci are little organisms (protozoa, I think) they need different meds to kill them. A great medicine that I used recently was called Corid. This was a powder the feed store sold and it was for bovine, but I called the 800 number on the package and they gave me a doseage of three Tablespoons per five gallons of drinking water.

    I think the medicated chick starter helps them a little bit, but sometimes it's just not effective for an environment will full blown cocci.......also, usually chickens have built up their own immunities naturally at around the age of 17 weeks old, so you usually don't have to worry about cocci after that.

    I never use the medicated chick starter, and I've raised alot of chickens now, and this was my first bout with cocci this year. I do think it was the weather....

    I sure hope this info helps!

    Sharon
     
  3. Kittymomma

    Kittymomma Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:[​IMG]

    That pretty much covers it. Don't be worried if you don't get many more answers to your question 'cause there really isn't much to add. I keep Corid on hand because while cocci can kill quickly it usually responds to treatment quickly too.
     
  4. Qi Chicken

    Qi Chicken Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 3, 2009
    We have had this same weather and recently posted a ? on dosage. I got the liquid Corid. It says 16 oz per 100 gallons for treatment and half that for prevention. Mine have it. So the numbers go to 4.84 ml (or 5) per gallon water.

    HOWEVER>>>>

    Speckledhen and others have said they use 9 ml per gallon.

    What dose is correct. I think I should give them 5 days of treatment. give them a break (WITH POLYVISOL) then retreat at the prevention dose. What are your ideas?? I hope this info helps you too OP!
     
  5. ashsmith

    ashsmith Out Of The Brooder

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    Jun 8, 2010
    Quote:Thanks so much for your quick response! I am glad to hear that cocci is always in dirt, so my chicks are getting exposed and are hopefully building immunity.

    Hot, humid, and wet pretty much describes our climate in south Mississippi from April - October, so I think medicated feed is good for my chicks. I'll also be adding sand to my outdoor run once ALL the grass is dead to keep it from getting too muddy in there.

    Thanks again for the quick feedback :)
     
  6. Kittymomma

    Kittymomma Chillin' With My Peeps

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    The problem with giving them the polyvisol IMO is that the cocci thrive on the b vitimins and the corid works by blocking them but doesn't kill off all the cocci, it just sort of starves most of the protazoa. Giving the poly right after treating for cocci will give the remaining protazoa a big boost that I think would more then offset the boost the chicks get. I'm not against polyvisol at all, just don't think it's the best idea right after treating for cocci. I've never tried it though so if you do decide to go that route please update with how it goes.
     

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