medicated or not?

Discussion in 'Feeding & Watering Your Flock' started by kdavis228, May 19, 2011.

  1. kdavis228

    kdavis228 Out Of The Brooder

    58
    0
    39
    Apr 25, 2011
    mississippi
    Should i use the purina medicated feed or not? What are the pros and cons of both?
     
  2. Fred's Hens

    Fred's Hens Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

    The pros of feeding medicated is that it is a blocker of cocci. Loosing ones flock to this is rather sad and expensive. It merely provides their own immune system time to develop, that's all. It is not an anti-biotic. At 8 weeks, most are done feeding it.

    Some folks never feed medicated and never have an issue. Others have had losses and wouldn't think of skipping it. It's the keeper's choice.
     
  3. gritsar

    gritsar Cows, Chooks & Impys - OH MY!

    28,907
    119
    408
    Nov 9, 2007
    SW Arkansas
    I'd have to ask what part of the country you live in? Is your enviroment warm and moist? Or dry with low humidity?

    I know in places like Arizona UNmedicated starter is the norm, cocci in the soil being less prevelant. Here unmedicated starter is virtually unheard of.
     
  4. kdavis228

    kdavis228 Out Of The Brooder

    58
    0
    39
    Apr 25, 2011
    mississippi
    South Mississippi
     
  5. gritsar

    gritsar Cows, Chooks & Impys - OH MY!

    28,907
    119
    408
    Nov 9, 2007
    SW Arkansas
    Quote:Ah yes, where in June, July, August, you can get wet just standing still, without being anywhere near a body of water. Know it well. [​IMG]

    Yep, I would suggest medicated. It help prevent the cocci from overwhelming the chicks body while at the same time allowing their immune systems to develop an immunity to it.

    The diarrhea coccidiosis causes can kill a chick quickly. Best thing IMHO is to feed the medicated and get them out on the dirt asap after that; body can't develop an immunity to something it's never been exposed to.

    The only time you wouldn't want to feed the medicated is if the chicks have already been vaccinated for cocci at the hatchery, but most times you have to specifically ask for that. Nothing bad will happen if you do feed medicated to vaccinated chicks, it just null and voids the vaccine.

    Incidentally, you don't have to feed Purina if you don't want to. Any good quality chick starter will do.
     
  6. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive True BYC Addict Premium Member

    30,026
    4,287
    541
    Apr 3, 2011
    southern Ohio
    I use medicated food, and have noticed that most contain amprolium as the active ingredient which is also the drug to treat cocci. As someone said it is not an antibiotic, it justs gives the chicks enough protection for them to build up an immunity to cocciddia. You take them off it before they start laying eggs, so I don't really see why it is not used more. We try to keep our chicks clean and dry, but let's face it, they contaminate everything in their brooder with poo, then wind up eating it.
     
  7. Neil Grassbaugh

    Neil Grassbaugh Chillin' With My Peeps

    741
    14
    151
    Sep 1, 2008
    Pullets destined to be cage layers are raised in cages as well. The buildings are very carefully washed down and sanitized before new chicks come in and the only droppings those birds ever come in contact with are their own and that of cage mates. And very little of that because the wire bottoms of the cage are covered at first with two layers of newspaper which soon goes away through the wire . Part of that management practice is to expose them to droppings so that they can react as desired with the anticoccidiastats (medication) in the feed.
    So the chickens with the most minimal exposure to the cocidia protozoa are afforded the protection of this program.

    Why not yours?
     
  8. gritsar

    gritsar Cows, Chooks & Impys - OH MY!

    28,907
    119
    408
    Nov 9, 2007
    SW Arkansas
    Quote:Not to start the great debate again, but why expose a living creature to a medication that may be totally unnecessary (or in the case of arid climates, hard to come by)?

    I'm not feeding it (medicated) to my broody raised chicks. Why? For one thing, I am feeding all ages so I use a flockraiser feed which is of course unmedicated. Using a creep feeder(s) for the chicks would be impossible with my set-up. Secondly and most importantly, there's really no reason to feed medicated to my broody raised chicks. They are getting slowly "innoculated" by being exposed to the dropping of their mom and the other chickens in the flock; who are presumably already immune. I'm keeping an eye out for any tell-tale signs of cocci from the new chicks (two sets), but so far so good *knock on wood*.

    They've been out, running around with the rest of the free range flocks, since they were three days old.

    Generally when people start talking about "programs" or what they do in commercial operations, I run the other way. The whole point of raising backyard birds for me - and in particular, free range birds - is to stay as far away from that stuff as possible.

    Off my soapbox now. [​IMG]
     
  9. Neil Grassbaugh

    Neil Grassbaugh Chillin' With My Peeps

    741
    14
    151
    Sep 1, 2008
    Quote:Not to start the great debate again, but why expose a living creature to a medication that may be totally unnecessary (or in the case of arid climates, hard to come by)?
    Think of the "medicated" chick starter, which is used to promote immunity to coccidiosis, as a component of a vaccination. It is more prophlactic than theraputic.

    I'm not feeding it (medicated) to my broody raised chicks. Why? For one thing, I am feeding all ages so I use a flockraiser feed which is of course unmedicated. Using a creep feeder(s) for the chicks would be impossible with my set-up. Secondly and most importantly, there's really no reason to feed medicated to my broody raised chicks. They are getting slowly "innoculated" by being exposed to the dropping of their mom and the other chickens in the flock; who are presumably already immune. I'm keeping an eye out for any tell-tale signs of cocci from the new chicks (two sets), but so far so good *knock on wood*.
    You are sortof correct here but the fact is, as you mentioned, chicks raised by a broody hen seldom get coccidiosis.

    They've been out, running around with the rest of the free range flocks, since they were three days old.

    Generally when people start talking about "programs" or what they do in commercial operations, I run the other way.
    I am sorry that the information, which is factual, and perhaps science in general frightens you. Please remember that before a large influx of science, which was quickly and very widely adopted by the poultry producers of the good old days, a very large percentage of chickens died of ailments easily prevented today. Coccidiosis being a MAJOR one. Industrial poultry producers are amazed at the loss of birds suffered by backyard poultry due to misinformation and resistance to modern methods.

    The whole point of raising backyard birds for me - and in particular, free range birds - is to stay as far away from that stuff as possible.
    I hope that you agree that there certainly is a place for "that stuff" and really do not promote ideas that are akin to ending vaccination for polio, not using antibiotic salve for dirty wounds, and letting broken bones heal without setting, etc. among humans.

    Off my soapbox now. [​IMG]
    And I will leave the science lecture hall.

    TRUST SCIENCE! It has taken us much further forward than superstition has. Dad about 80 years ago.
     
  10. gritsar

    gritsar Cows, Chooks & Impys - OH MY!

    28,907
    119
    408
    Nov 9, 2007
    SW Arkansas
    Quote:Not to start the great debate again, but why expose a living creature to a medication that may be totally unnecessary (or in the case of arid climates, hard to come by)?
    Think of the "medicated" chick starter, which is used to promote immunity to coccidiosis, as a component of a vaccination. It is more prophlactic than theraputic.

    I'm not feeding it (medicated) to my broody raised chicks. Why? For one thing, I am feeding all ages so I use a flockraiser feed which is of course unmedicated. Using a creep feeder(s) for the chicks would be impossible with my set-up. Secondly and most importantly, there's really no reason to feed medicated to my broody raised chicks. They are getting slowly "innoculated" by being exposed to the dropping of their mom and the other chickens in the flock; who are presumably already immune. I'm keeping an eye out for any tell-tale signs of cocci from the new chicks (two sets), but so far so good *knock on wood*.
    You are sortof correct here but the fact is, as you mentioned, chicks raised by a broody hen seldom get coccidiosis.

    They've been out, running around with the rest of the free range flocks, since they were three days old.

    Generally when people start talking about "programs" or what they do in commercial operations, I run the other way.
    I am sorry that the information, which is factual, and perhaps science in general frightens you. Please remember that before a large influx of science, which was quickly and very widely adopted by the poultry producers of the good old days, a very large percentage of chickens died of ailments easily prevented today. Coccidiosis being a MAJOR one. Industrial poultry producers are amazed at the loss of birds suffered by backyard poultry due to misinformation and resistance to modern methods.

    The whole point of raising backyard birds for me - and in particular, free range birds - is to stay as far away from that stuff as possible.
    I hope that you agree that there certainly is a place for "that stuff" and really do not promote ideas that are akin to ending vaccination for polio, not using antibiotic salve for dirty wounds, and letting broken bones heal without setting, etc. among humans.

    Off my soapbox now. [​IMG]
    And I will leave the science lecture hall.

    TRUST SCIENCE! It has taken us much further forward than superstition has. Dad about 80 years ago.

    I'm not going to continue to fuel a fire that isn't necessary. I have things to do, like go out and play with my chickens, as I'm sure you do. I feel we both have the right to take care of our animals in the way we see fit. I don't have anything against modern science when I feel it makes sense to me. I'm well educated. I read, I research and then I decide what works best for me, my family and the animals that are trusting me for their care. I vaccinate, medicate, treat when I feel it is necessary. Every one of my animals, even the tiniest chick, is precious to me. What I don't do, is give (alot of) medications "just in case". There are alot of "just in cases" in life. Sometimes it is better to deal with them when they come up, not try to combat them all before they happen.

    I like your dad's quote. More than anything I enjoy the advice of our elder population. I treasure them.

    I'd like to share something with you that my commercial broiler farmer neighbors have said to me (on more than one occasion) when I have fretted over bio-security between my free range birds and their housed birds. My concerns have always been for their birds; after all that's their livelihoods. My birds are a hobby; a beloved hobby, but a hobby nonetheless. These broiler farmers have told me "Kat, we're more worried about what OUR birds can pass on to yours, not the other way around". That's what the farmers themselves have to say about their overly vaccinated, overly medicated commercial birds, not what the PR people at Tyson or Pilgrims Pride have to say.

    I bid you peace. [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: May 19, 2011

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by