Medications and Suppliments to Have on Hand?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Bridebeliever, Oct 6, 2015.

  1. Bridebeliever

    Bridebeliever Chillin' With My Peeps

    I am new to chickens and I have 9 chicks aged 3 weeks. All are healthy and strong. My question is what types of things should I just have on hand because "stuff happens". I live 45 minutes from the closest store or feed store so I don't want to be in a panic when things do come up. My chicks have only been vaccinated against Mareks. Thanks!
     
  2. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member Project Manager

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    Corid for coccidiosis is a must have for me.

    -Kathy
     
  3. Egghead_Jr

    Egghead_Jr Overrun With Chickens

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    Blue Kote spray antiseptic. It's all I have for chicken first aid. Stuff happens like over pecking due to not building a larger coop soon enough or when integrating new birds or an animal attack. Sprays on blue to cover wound which keeps the other birds from pecking at it. Is an antiseptic so no infection.

    Likely all you'll ever need. If your in an area prevalent with cocci then use medicated feed for the first 10-12 weeks.
     
    Last edited: Oct 6, 2015
  4. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member Project Manager

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    Feed medicated with amprolium is fine, just remember that it's no guarantee that they won't get coccidiosis. Best to also have Corid, Amprol or AmproMed.

    -Kathy
     
  5. Bridebeliever

    Bridebeliever Chillin' With My Peeps

    How do I know if my area is prevalent for that or not? I live in NW Washington in forest area. No other chickens or other animals have ever been where they will be living. It's an approximately 8x17 cement floor and cinder block wall coop. I realize it's in their feces and can be picked up that way.
     
  6. MeepBeep

    MeepBeep Chillin' With My Peeps


    Cocci is everywhere, the strains that effect chickens will be more prevalent where there are a lot of other wild birds in close proximity or if you have other poultry nearby...

    Medicated feed is a good start and allows most birds to build up a resistance to it, but if your birds get sick, or for whatever reason lapse their resistance or if you have other types of birds like peafowl that are more susceptible to having a cocci break out and can die rapidly it's best to have some Amprolium on hand at all times... The dosage in medicated feed is a preventative level,if you have an outbreak you need a higher dosage...

    IMO it's worth the money to have a bag of Amprolium on standby at all times...

    I also keep a bottle of Tylan 50 on hand with few dozen syringes, to treat any potential respiratory infections...
     
    Last edited: Oct 6, 2015
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  7. Egghead_Jr

    Egghead_Jr Overrun With Chickens

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    I'd ask people in your area if they have a problem with cocci that's how you'd know. I live in the frozen north of New England and use electric netting with movable coops. My birds are only in a stationary pen during the frozen winter so have no fear of heavy concentrations or (poultry sick) soil. Warm climates have higher concentrations of cocci than those with winters. As a result I don't even have a need to use medicated starter. So certainly don't have a need to have on hand Amprolium.

    It's unnatural for birds to develop respiratory problems. They don't get colds so an indication of unwanted disease. I'd cull at the first sign of a problem and quarantine the rest of that coop to determine if an outbreak rather than treat. But that's me and my ideals of a healthy flock, never had any such problem. So really all I keep on hand is Blue Kote and trust me when I say you'll eventually need it. As for other things it's up to you and lord knows if you'll ever use any of it. Aspirin most of us have in the medicine cabinet and useful after an accidental leg injury. Splinting material you'll have on hand anyway. I've used popsicle sticks and gauze for dislocated hock then crushed half an aspirin into a small bowl while the bird is separated for recovery. That happened once in five years. I use Blue Kote antiseptic at least once a year. A can goes a long way. It'll be in the sheep/cattle section at your feed store.
     
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