Medications over the counter for injuries

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Smith Hill Cottage, Dec 21, 2012.

  1. Smith Hill Cottage

    Smith Hill Cottage New Egg

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    Please clarify meds available via drug store for surface injuries
    Also would appreciate homemade "electrolyte" recipe for chickens
     
  2. Judy

    Judy Moderator Staff Member

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    You can use most any med on a chicken that you use on people. The one exception, which is important, is don't use anything topical which has a numbing agent in the "caine" family, which can actually cause their death. Examples are cetacaine, benzocaine -- anything ending in "caine." In the sticky at the top of this forum (blue box in forum view where you see thread titles) there are links to several articles on meds. Many here clean minor wounds with a dilute Betadine solution then apply whatever version of Neosporin or Bacitracin they have on hand. BluKote is also often used for minor wounds. It is mostly gentian violet, which is an old timers' people remedy. Now you will probably only find it in a feed store, as it stains everything, but it is a mild antiseptic and has the advantage of discouraging others from pecking.

    I don't know of a formula for electrolytes, but as a rule they should be used sparingly and only for 2 or 3 days at most. I don't think you can make it from common household items. An easy way to add a little electrolytes is add a slosh of a sports drink like Gatorade to drinking water. This might help them recover from shipping stress if used for a day or two, for example, as they may be a little dehydrated on arrival. The slight sugar boost after shipping stress might also be helpful.
     
    1 person likes this.
  3. cowcreekgeek

    cowcreekgeek Chillin' With My Peeps

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    ASPIRIN SOLUTION
    Used as a general treatment for reducing distress conditions of birds (fever or listlessness) that accompanies many diseases.
    Dissolve five (5 grain) aspirin tablets in one gallon of water.
    Offer this solution free-choice to the birds for the duration of an illness. The solution aspirin equivalent to 25 grains/gallon or 324 mg/gallon of drinking water. The dosage rate is about 25 mg/lb body weight per day.

    ASTRINGENT SOLUTION
    This solution can be used to treat young birds that show non-typical disease symptoms of poor growth. The solution can also be given to birds suffering from respiratory diseases that produce a large amount of mucus exudate. This solution will help "cut through" the mucus and allow it to be expelled easier.
    Two quarts of apple cider vinegar diluted into 100 gallons of water
    (4 teaspoons/gallon)
    The tannin in the apple cider vinegar aide in removing any mucus or coating from the mouth, throat, or intestinal tract. Nutrients and drugs are more readily absorbed. Offer this solution as the only drinking water source for two to three day intervals.

    Amino Acid Solution
    100 grams (7 fl oz) dl-methionine and 110 grams (6 fl oz) l-lysine HCl dissolved in 50 gallons water
    -or-
    2 grams (.8 tsp) dl-methionine and 2.2 grams (.7 tsp) l-lysine HCl in one gallon of water
    Offer the solution free-choice to the birds as an aide to reducing the depressing effects of low-protein diets. Make up a fresh solution daily and offer to birds in clean waterers. All measurements in parentheses () are volumetric measurements while those expressed in grams are weight measurements.

    Sucrose Solution
    10 ounces of granulated sugar per gallon of water
    This solution may be given as an energy treatment for weak chicks. Offer the solution as the only water source for the first 7-10 days. Clean the drinkers and replace with fresh solution at least once daily. The solution shown above contains eight percent sugar and approximately 2000 kilocalories per gallon.
     
  4. Judy

    Judy Moderator Staff Member

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    cowcreekgeek, do you have a source recommending adding methionine to a poultry diet? I have read of its toxicity to chickens and would be interested in your source.
     
    Last edited: Dec 23, 2012
  5. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    The first link has a formula for a homemade electrolyte, but why bother when you can use something like Pedialtye?

    http://www.avianweb.com/sickbirdcare.html

    Other helpful links:
    http://veterinarycalendar.dvm360.com/avhc/article/articleDetail.jsp?id=557934&sk=&date=&pageID=3
    http://www.avianweb.com/erformula.html#cropneedle
    https://www.backyardchickens.com/t/722041/how-to-t-feed-a-sick-chicken-and-give-subcutaneous-fluid
    http://forum.backyardpoultry.com/viewtopic.php?t=7933
     
  6. cowcreekgeek

    cowcreekgeek Chillin' With My Peeps

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    The recipe was provided by Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, MSU Ext. Svc., and was current as of October 14, 2010.

    Methionine is classified as an essential amino acid, and is required for proper cell development and feathering. Poultry animals cannot biologically produce methionine on their own. In excess, as w/ protein, and many vitamins, it can be toxic ... another one of those 'all good things in moderation' things ~'-)

    It appears that (as usual) many commercial broiler producers have pushed to envelope a bit too far, in their efforts to produce bigger birds faster:

    Dibner JJ, Kitchell ML, Robery WW, Yersin AG, Wideman RF, Jr, Dunn PA. Liver damage in mature laying hens: Comparison of field samples with livers from layers fed high levels of 2-hydroxy-40(methylthio) butanoic acid (hmb, Alimet) or dl-methionine (dlm). J Poultry Res, 1995, In Press.

    I thought it was allowed in organic poultry production, but Jim Riddle, Organic Outreach Coordinator for the University of Minnesota, stated the following w/in his presentation: "DL-Methionine allowed for poultry until October 21, 2012," which gives good reason to see why this has changed (as it might be for the very reason you suspected )-;~

    But, turns out that ain't it ... it's the 'DL-' that's got folks, and the FDA, concerned ~'-)

    Turns out the good Dr.'s statement simply isn't accurate: Synthetic methionine *is* allowed (or *was* allowed, and it appears to now be allowed again, but at lower levels, so as to appease growing concern w/ it's use, and allow sufficient time for finding reasonable alternatives).

    More current, and accurate, info on this follows ...

    I realize that most folks aren't concerned w/ growing/producing organically, but if it's allowed for them? It's almost gotta be safe for the rest of us ~'-)
     

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