Meloxicam for bumblefoot surgery?

echo81577

Chirping
Nov 7, 2020
52
32
63
I have Meloxicam 7.5 mg tablets that is expired 2 years ago. Can I use this for my chicken pre bumblefoot surgery? How much to give? A quarter of this tablet would be about 2 mg.

I do not have any chlorhexidine but I do have iodine, Vetricin, coloidial silver and neosporin. Any other advice on this?
Thank you!
 

ChickenCanoe

Enabler
Premium Feather Member
11 Years
Nov 23, 2010
33,529
28,793
1,097
St. Louis, MO
It can likely still be used. Drug companies are usually conservative on the expiration dates so can sometimes be effective for a period of time after.
It can be effective as an anti-inflammatory and pain killer so may be useful prior to surgery.
I have not used Vetericyn but may be useful.
I usually stick with iodine and neosporin.
Stay away from the colloidal silver. It serves no proven medical purpose. It is a mineral that is not is not an essential mineral. It will build up in the body and discolor skin, eyes and other body parts. In larger doses it can cause serious side effects and reacts negatively with several antibiotics. I don't treat any ailment with jewelry.
Is surgery necessary? Can you post pictures?
 

Lizzy733

Crowing
Nov 13, 2018
1,050
1,902
251
New Zealand
Meloxicam will put a strain on their kidneys, I think... That or liver, can't recall... So use it with caution. If the bumblefoot isn't so bad, I personally wouldn't opt for painkillers as they tend to fare well without them anyway and I'd rather not stress their system.

'loxicam\com' family painkillers are the only painkillers we use at the rescue centre I volunteer at, so really is the only painkillers that could be recommended for birds. Aspirin etc cause the same organ strain for dosage and aren't actually effective enough to justify their use. - this is according to the avian vets we have onsite.

I'm sorry, I don't know the dosage off my head and we use a liquid suspension which I can't recall the concentration of, but typically give around .5ml for a 500g bird like a Kereru. - typically only once a day.

I had a shaver hen with acites and was advised to give her 1ml once a day of our solution. Really wish I could remember the concentration.
 

Lizzy733

Crowing
Nov 13, 2018
1,050
1,902
251
New Zealand
Meloxicam will put a strain on their kidneys, I think... That or liver, can't recall... So use it with caution. If the bumblefoot isn't so bad, I personally wouldn't opt for painkillers as they tend to fare well without them anyway and I'd rather not stress their system.

'loxicam\com' family painkillers are the only painkillers we use at the rescue centre I volunteer at, so really is the only painkillers that could be recommended for birds. Aspirin etc cause the same organ strain for dosage and aren't actually effective enough to justify their use. - this is according to the avian vets we have onsite.

I'm sorry, I don't know the dosage off my head and we use a liquid suspension which I can't recall the concentration of, but typically give around .5ml for a 500g bird like a Kereru. - typically only once a day.

I had a shaver hen with acites and was advised to give her 1ml once a day of our solution. Really wish I could remember the concentration.
Just looked it up is 1.5mg/ml in the oral
suspension
 

echo81577

Chirping
Nov 7, 2020
52
32
63
It can likely still be used. Drug companies are usually conservative on the expiration dates so can sometimes be effective for a period of time after.
It can be effective as an anti-inflammatory and pain killer so may be useful prior to surgery.
I have not used Vetericyn but may be useful.
I usually stick with iodine and neosporin.
Stay away from the colloidal silver. It serves no proven medical purpose. It is a mineral that is not is not an essential mineral. It will build up in the body and discolor skin, eyes and other body parts. In larger doses it can cause serious side effects and reacts negatively with several antibiotics. I don't treat any ailment with jewelry.
Is surgery necessary? Can you post pictures?
Thanks. Yes I will post some pictures in just a bit. I've never been able to catch this one but I can see it on the top of her foot not just underneath that's how I know there's a problem. What is the correct dosage of that 7.5 mg tablet? I think I could only take it down as small as the 2 mg. Is that okay? Am I going to OD my chicken??
 

ChickenCanoe

Enabler
Premium Feather Member
11 Years
Nov 23, 2010
33,529
28,793
1,097
St. Louis, MO
I usually don't give meds often enough to know dosages off the top of my head. Read that as rarely, if ever.
It is easiest to catch a chicken off the roost right after dusk.
I have treated many cases of bumblefoot. I originally used surgery in severe cases but I've chosen less invasive methods since then.
 

Lizzy733

Crowing
Nov 13, 2018
1,050
1,902
251
New Zealand
Thanks. Yes I will post some pictures in just a bit. I've never been able to catch this one but I can see it on the top of her foot not just underneath that's how I know there's a problem. What is the correct dosage of that 7.5 mg tablet? I think I could only take it down as small as the 2 mg. Is that okay? Am I going to OD my chicken??
OD = more stressful on the kidneys/liver may not be an issue for a one-off, but keep an eye on the urates after - yellow urates would indicate liver/kidney stress - can go all the way up to a tumeric yellow if bad.

I know some painkillers effectiveness wanes with time, so perhaps the side effects as well, but couldn't say for sure. Not a vet myself and running off the knowledge I've accumulated helping at Birdcare once a week for the past year.

Would you be able to crush the remaining 2ml and split the powder down to 1.5ml then make a suspension with a bit of water to give via syringe? That might be the safest bet.

Since she's so wild, when you wrap her, tuck the towel under her wings before wrapping her body - tends to keep them from flapping out. It's a good trick I've picked up from Birdcare.

I do all my bumblefoot extractions over a running tap so I can keep the wound clear so I can see what I'm doing around any bleeding. Soaking the feet in a warm Epsom salts bath for at least 30 mins should help soften up the kernel for extraction. I use ceramic hooks for digging out infected tissue left behind once the kernel is removed.

When done, I pack the wound with betadine, pad thickly with non-stick gauze and wrap it up with vetwrap - two thin strips between the toes, over the gauze and up the leg, then one thick wrap around the thin ones around the leg to hold everything in place. - has worked good for me with no kickouts and keeps the wound dry and clean.
 

Lizzy733

Crowing
Nov 13, 2018
1,050
1,902
251
New Zealand
OD = more stressful on the kidneys/liver may not be an issue for a one-off, but keep an eye on the urates after - yellow urates would indicate liver/kidney stress - can go all the way up to a tumeric yellow if bad.

I know some painkillers effectiveness wanes with time, so perhaps the side effects as well, but couldn't say for sure. Not a vet myself and running off the knowledge I've accumulated helping at Birdcare once a week for the past year.

Would you be able to crush the remaining 2ml and split the powder down to 1.5ml then make a suspension with a bit of water to give via syringe? That might be the safest bet.

Since she's so wild, when you wrap her, tuck the towel under her wings before wrapping her body - tends to keep them from flapping out. It's a good trick I've picked up from Birdcare.

I do all my bumblefoot extractions over a running tap so I can keep the wound clear so I can see what I'm doing around any bleeding. Soaking the feet in a warm Epsom salts bath for at least 30 mins should help soften up the kernel for extraction. I use ceramic hooks for digging out infected tissue left behind once the kernel is removed.

When done, I pack the wound with betadine, pad thickly with non-stick gauze and wrap it up with vetwrap - two thin strips between the toes, over the gauze and up the leg, then one thick wrap around the thin ones around the leg to hold everything in place. - has worked good for me with no kickouts and keeps the wound dry and clean.
As a side note, Birdcare essentially survives on expired meds. It's never deterred our vets from prescribing them for our sensitive native birds.
 

echo81577

Chirping
Nov 7, 2020
52
32
63
I have Meloxicam 7.5 mg tablets that is expired 2 years ago. Can I use this for my chicken pre bumblefoot surgery? How much to give? A quarter of this tablet would be about 2 mg.

I do not have any chlorhexidine but I do have iodine, Vetricin, coloidial silver and neosporin. Any other advice on this?
Thank you!
 

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echo81577

Chirping
Nov 7, 2020
52
32
63
OD = more stressful on the kidneys/liver may not be an issue for a one-off, but keep an eye on the urates after - yellow urates would indicate liver/kidney stress - can go all the way up to a tumeric yellow if bad.

I know some painkillers effectiveness wanes with time, so perhaps the side effects as well, but couldn't say for sure. Not a vet myself and running off the knowledge I've accumulated helping at Birdcare once a week for the past year.

Would you be able to crush the remaining 2ml and split the powder down to 1.5ml then make a suspension with a bit of water to give via syringe? That might be the safest bet.

Since she's so wild, when you wrap her, tuck the towel under her wings before wrapping her body - tends to keep them from flapping out. It's a good trick I've picked up from Birdcare.

I do all my bumblefoot extractions over a running tap so I can keep the wound clear so I can see what I'm doing around any bleeding. Soaking the feet in a warm Epsom salts bath for at least 30 mins should help soften up the kernel for extraction. I use ceramic hooks for digging out infected tissue left behind once the kernel is removed.

When done, I pack the wound with betadine, pad thickly with non-stick gauze and wrap it up with vetwrap - two thin strips between the toes, over the gauze and up the leg, then one thick wrap around the thin ones around the leg to hold everything in place. - has worked good for me with no kickouts and keeps the wound dry and clean.
 

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