metal waterer smells really bad

Discussion in 'Feeding & Watering Your Flock' started by jbugw, Jan 27, 2016.

  1. jbugw

    jbugw Out Of The Brooder

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    I can't describe the smell, it doesn't really smell like anything I can think of. Its a metal waterer that we are using a heater on right now. It smells without the heater too but not as bad. Every time I lift the lid to add water the smell comes out and it smells bad. I have cleaned it using dish soap but the very next day it smelled again. I scrubbed it and there does seem to be some deterioration? of the metal. Its not smooth inside but it doesn't come off with hot water and scrub brush. Its not rusty. I have not tried bleach yet. Hesitant to try vinegar for cleaning since its a metal container. What is going on and am I ultimately going to need to replace the waterer?
     
    Last edited: Jan 27, 2016
  2. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe Chicken Obsessed

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    I can't really help much but definitely don't use vinegar or it will rust.
    How about ammonia or Lysol?
    Bleach wouldn't be a bad idea. Just fill it with water and put a half cup bleach per 3 gallons and let it sit. At least then you'll know no bacteria survive.
     
  3. Laurie3060

    Laurie3060 New Egg

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    If the dirt is not comming off then maybe it need replacing- try a plastic one as they are easier to clean and I have never had a problem with them. [​IMG]
     
  4. Egghead_Jr

    Egghead_Jr Overrun With Chickens

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    Using vinegar to scrub clean is an excellent non toxic mild acid. What you don't want is to keep vinegar in water with galvanized metal. I use vinegar to clean everything then rinse with water. No ill effect on metal but will now be sterile and wont have odor. Stagnant water smells and builds microbes, no getting around that. You do need to clean your water dispensers on occasion. More frequently in summer. Stagnant water will stain the containers. Not a worry if you scrub clean, microbes are dead and your left with a stain. Plastic or galvanized water containers are stained. The way it is. Perhaps a special made stainless steel container could be scrubbed for visual cleanliness.
     
    Last edited: Jan 28, 2016
  5. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe Chicken Obsessed

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    Good points.

    That's kind of the problem with metal containers, they have welded seams that hold debris. If they can be rinsed well, the vinegar can be removed.

    All of mine get thoroughly cleaned at least weekly.
     
    Last edited: Jan 28, 2016
  6. jbugw

    jbugw Out Of The Brooder

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    I went ahead and replaced it. Its galvanized. The interior walls feel like they are rusted- bumpy and rough but aren't colored like rust. Its not stained, well there is some staining but what I am looking at isn't just stained its 3D. And I discovered my "spare" (it leaks pretty bad so I don't like to use it) had rusted fairly badly as did my duck 5 gal (I don't use during the winter because I have no way to keep it thawed). So annoyed. I thought the plastic ones would be worse with bacteria and smells and I can only use metal with my water heater in the coop. Wondering if I should switch to plastic when I don't need the heater. I use rubber pans for the ducks in the winter but they get too nasty to use during the summer since the ducks and geese deposit all kinds of nastys in there. During the winter, when the freeze solid overnight, I can slam them into a tree and everything comes out in a big ice chunk- dirt and all.
     
  7. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe Chicken Obsessed

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    For the black rubber tubs, I often use a birdbath heater in them and it works well. However, I raise Mediterranean breeds and those don't work for roosters since they have to dip their wattles in the water to drink and they get frostbitten.
     
  8. mg15

    mg15 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Is the waterer made in USA ?
    I had bought one and it was sprayed painted
    with silver paint. the thing was made in Mexico.
    a knock off. I can't even imagine what was under the
    spray paint and what the metal was made of.
    If something smells as bad as what you say
    get rid of it. It is not worth the sickness that
    will come with the smell, better to be on the
    safe side than with something that stinks.
     
  9. jbugw

    jbugw Out Of The Brooder

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    My chickens would stand on the tubs and tip them over. I didn't think they could until I saw one of them do it in my duck pen. I can't use any kind of heater in my duck pen water because the geese share it and they try to eat or "chew" on everything. I am amazed those things are still alive with the stuff they put in their mouths. I could probably put some rocks in the bottom for the chickens but our waterer is in the coop, do they ever pull the birdbath heater out? I would worry about a potential fire if they pulled out. The heater is on probably 9 hours a day. Its pretty effective but it does evaporate the water pretty quick (at least I think it does) but 3 out of my 4 metal waterers are rusted or ??? what ever is wrong with this one. One of them is less than a year old, the other are just under 2.
     
  10. jbugw

    jbugw Out Of The Brooder

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    It is made in USA. Its galvanized steel. I did replace it. And the new one has too tight of a seal- I had 1 previous one with a tight seal and one with a really loose seal. So they either leak or I have to go out and wiggle it to get a decent amount of water in the tray. I am going to have to come up with something better.
     

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