Might get a roo need help!! Please

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by 7L Farm, Nov 16, 2010.

  1. 7L Farm

    7L Farm Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 22, 2010
    Anderson, Texas
    I live on a 100 acres in Texas. A friend has a RIR ROO 6 months old.I have 10 RIR pullets that are between 26 & 30 weeks old. The friend wants me to take the roo. I never really wanted a roo but now considering for the safety of my girls. My chicks are not all laying but almost. Will, the girls want this addition are not. I would feel safer about letting them out more which I know they would like. Also, how if I do choose to take the roo do I introduce to my girls. Here's a pic. I'm also thinking of getting more chicks soon. Please be honest I don't wanna do the wrong thing. The [​IMG]girls are great at laying.
     
  2. Shifty Joe

    Shifty Joe Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Roo add an interesting dynamic to your flock and it's up to what you want out of your flock if you get one.

    1) An established rooster will gladly become the first line of defense for his girls... however keep in mind he might also view you as a threat. This may be the biggest down side to roosters, I would suggest looking in the forum for ways to handle this.
    2) He will mate with the hen... and mate often. Depending on the number of hens, this may lead to loss of feathers. But on the upside you can hatch your eggs which very nice perk.
    3) He will crow... all the time.


    I have always had a rooster in my flock and wouldn't consider having a flock without one. The neighbors are willing to overlook the crowing for a dozen eggs a week, which is a good deal in my book. Sadly the rooster got into a habit of attacking the wife when she was collecting eggs and we had to switch him out with a calmer rooster.
     
    Last edited: Nov 16, 2010
  3. Alabama ee

    Alabama ee Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Maybe..I would not get it for the safety of your hens. He might delay things.. However, if you have a large dog, coyote, etc that wants to eat your chickens, the creature will if all that stands in the way is a roo.

    Another thing is some roos, especially RIR's, can be aggressive toward people. Roos can also be over zealous with the hens and cause missing feathers, etc.

    I have a EE roo. He is over amourous with one hen who has missing back feathers as a result. Also, he did go through a short teenager phase, but it was not long lasting. He ran up and pecked my foot hard enough to bleed when I was carry food out. I let him know he was out of line, and that was that. He has not done it again.

    All that said, I really like him. He is very pretty and I really enjoy his cock-a-doodle-doo in the morning.
     
  4. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner True BYC Addict

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    Northwest Arkansas
    There are no correct absolute answers in your position. Chickens are living animals and almost anything can happen. We can tell you from our experiences what we think will happen or what happened to us, but there is no guarantee that you will have the same experience.

    First, quarantine. If your friend has not introduced any new chickens for the last couple of months, I don't see a big benefit in putting the rooster in quarantine by himself. If he has not been exposed to any new chickens lately, he probably has a immumity to any disease that he has that he could give to your girls. He will probably not show any symptoms in a month quarantine by himself. To get a meaningful quarantine, you would need to house one of your girls with him to see if they give each other any disease. It is just as likely that your girls have a disease they have developed an immunity to as it is that he has one that will affect them. This way, you put one of your girls at risk, not all ten. Parasites like mites, lice and worms are different. It is not a bad idea to check him carefully for any of these before you mix them.

    It is really hard to say what will happen in these circumstances. It depends a lot on the personalities of the individuals and the maturity of the rooster. One really complicating factor is that a mature hen will sometimes totally reject an immature rooster. If he cannot sway her by the pure brilliance of his maturity and personality, more mature hens will often beat up a rooster, making his life miserable until he matures. I had a 15 week old rooster that the year old hens accepted no problem. I've had older roosters that they would not accept. Age is a very important factor, but it is not the only one.

    An immature rooster often has hormones out of control. His instincts tell him that he absolutely has to make sure that every egg laid is fertile. It does not matter if the pullet or hen agrees, he has to make sure they are fertile. He is often bigger and stronger and can force his way, but sometimes the pullets or hens vigorously resist. This is especially true of pullets that are not yet laying. It is not just the rooster and his brilliant personality, but also the maturity of the pullet. For the act to go smoothly, both the rooster and the pullet have to do their part, otherwise it can get ugly. Flocks made up of adolescent roosters and adolescent pullets often are a lot more exciting than flocks with mature roosters and hens.

    When you have a flock of just hens, one will often take on the roll of the rooster in flock protection, finding food, all that. If you introduce a rooster, she may fight to defend her dominant position. But sometimes she seems to be the first one to welcome the new rooster and stick by his side.

    Even with the ages of yours it is possible that you can introduce a rooster and things will go very smoothly. I think it is more likely that things will get pretty exciting for a while, until they mature some more. It may take a month or it may take several months for them to settle down, if they have initial problems.

    When introducing a rooster to a flock of hens, I suggest just turning him lose with them. I don't see a lot of benefit in housing him next to then for a week or so, where they can get used to each other like I would suggest in a normal integration. A good mature rooster will immediately mate with the hens to establish his dominance and they will accept him without too much fuss. That's when it goes great. Or they will resist his advances whether they are used to him or not. When you are ready for them to mix, after quarantine if you decide to quarantine, just let him go where the hens have room to get away if they want to and see what happens.

    Good luck! I don't know if this helps you or not.
     
  5. 7L Farm

    7L Farm Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Anderson, Texas
    Quote:Hey, thanks I kinda just like having hens but on the other hand I want more chickens. I, also want the chicks to have more freedom.My freind has an incubator & said I could use it another plus. This freind has raised chickens alot longer than I.He says the roos in perfect health & if I do take him to just let him in the pin. I went last night & handled the bird with the bird not having any resistance for whatever thats worth.
     
  6. abhaya

    abhaya Chillin' With My Peeps

    Nov 5, 2010
    cookeville, tn
    I just added a roster to my flock and all is going well he runs with the girls and they all seem pretty happy. I hope someone will go broody in the spring and I will get some chicks
     
  7. Nostalchic

    Nostalchic Chillin' With My Peeps

    Well, sorry to add a dissenting point of view, but my experience with roosters has been less than positive. RIR roosters are somewhat notorious for being aggressive, even downright mean, and the ones we had fit that picture. We've had a Polish roo (Puff, how intimidating is that?) and he - alone - with 30 hens, defeathered half of them to the point where they may never recover feathers, and attacked us also, often drawing blood, despite our assertive pack leader attitudes and re-training attempts. Most recently, my two absolutely gorgeous Maran roosters that were raised in my flock reached sexual maturity and began beating up on the sweetest and most docile/friendly of my hens, until their heads were bruised and bloodied. My chickens have LOTS of space, well fed, get to free-range, there really was no excuse. I love to watch SOME of the flock dynamics (not these) and enjoyed their sweeter moments, but I haven't had one yet that was effectively protective at the crucial time, and my flock is so much happier and more peaceful now that the Marans are gone - well, not gone, but being brined right now, and then into the oven... (PS: I guess I should remove them from my lines - below - they aren't so gorgeous now:(
     
    Last edited: Nov 16, 2010
  8. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner True BYC Addict

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    Quote:I don't consider this a dissenting view. It is one of the times somebody had a bad experience and is well worth sharing. Sometimes we have good experiences. Sometimes we have bad experiences. They are living animals. Nobody can tell you what will absolutely happen with yours. Some are brutes and deserve to be introduced to the crock pot. I've made the introduction myself to both roosters and hens when their behavior did not improve the serenity of my flock.
     
  9. 7L Farm

    7L Farm Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 22, 2010
    Anderson, Texas
    It seems to be going alot better than the get go. The monster was beating my hens up .Guess he has to learn as we all do. He is now being more courteous to my hens. He is trying to be more of a provider & a protector. Will see as time goes on.
     
  10. joebryant

    joebryant Overrun With Chickens

    I didn't bother to read the other posts. If he's a good guy who treats YOU and your family right plus takes good care of his harem, keep him. If he attacks you, yours, and others, eyes are too important to lose, use him for chickens and dumplings.
    I had one mean rooster, never again. There are too many good ones.
     

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